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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 473 pages of information about Balder the Beautiful, Volume I..

[780] L.F.  Sauve, Le Folk-lore des Hautes-Vosges (Paris, 1889), p. 176.

[781] L.F.  Sauve, op. cit. pp. 176 sq.

[782] Ernst Meier, Deutsche Sagen, Sitten und Gebraeuche aus Schwaben (Stuttgart, 1852), pp. 184 sq., No. 203.

[783] E. Meier, op. cit. pp. 191 sq., No. 215.  A similar story of the shoeing of a woman in the shape of a horse is reported from Silesia.  See R. Kuehnau, Schlesische Sagen (Berlin, 1910-1913), iii. pp. 27 sq., No. 1380.

[784] R. Kuehnau, Schlesische Sagen (Berlin, 1910-1913), iii. pp. 23 sq., No. 1375.  Compare id., iii. pp. 28 sq., No. 1381.

[785] See for example L. Strackerjan, Aberglaube und Sagen aus dem Herzogthum Oldenburg (Oldenburg, 1867), i. pp. 328, 329, 334, 339; W. von Schulenburg, Wendische Volkssagen und Gebraeuche aus dem Spreewald (Leipsic, 1880), pp. 164, 165 sq.; H. Proehle, Harzsagen (Leipsic, 1859), i. 100 sq. The belief in such things is said to be universal among the ignorant and superstitious in Germany.  See A. Wuttke, Der deutsche Volksaberglaube*[2] (Berlin, 1869), p. 150, Sec. 217.  In Wales, also, “the possibility of injuring or marking the witch in her assumed shape so deeply that the bruise remained a mark on her in her natural form was a common belief” (J.  Ceredig Davies, Folk-lore of West and Mid-Wales, Aberystwyth, 1911, p. 243).  For Welsh stories of this sort, see J. Ceredig Davies, l.c.; Rev. Elias Owen, Welsh Folk-lore (Oswestry and Wrexham, N.D., preface dated 1896), pp. 228 sq.; M. Trevelyan, Folk-lore and Folk-stories of Wales (London, 1909), p. 214.

[786] L. Strackerjan, Aberglaube und Sagen aus dem Herzogthum Oldenburg (Oldenburg, 1867), i. p. 361, Sec. 239.

[787] Marie Trevelyan, Folk-lore and Folk-stories of Wales (London, 1909), p. 210.

[788] L. Strackerjan, Aberglaube und Sagen aus dem Herzogthum Oldenburg (Oldenburg, 1867), i. p. 358, Sec. 238.

[789] L. Strackerjan, op. cit. i. p. 360, Sec. 238e.

[790] “The ‘Witch-burning’ at Clonmell,” Folk-lore, vi. (1895) pp. 373-384.  The account there printed is based on the reports of the judicial proceedings before the magistrates and the judge, which were published in The Irish Times for March 26th, 27th, and 28th, April 2nd, 3rd, 6th, and 8th, and July 6th, 1895.

[791] John Graham Dalyell, The Darker Superstitions of Scotland (Edinburgh, 1834), p. 185.  In this passage “quick” is used in the old sense of “living,” as in the phrase “the quick and the dead.” Nois is “nose,” hoill is “hole,” quhilk (whilk) is “which,” and be is “by.”

[792] J.G.  Dalyell, op. cit. p. 186. Bestiall=animals; seik=sick; calling=driving; guidis=cattle.

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