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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 221 pages of information about Illustrated History of Furniture.

The growth of the Roman Empire eastward, the colonisation of Oriental countries, and subsequently the establishment of an Eastern Empire, produced gradually an alteration in Greek design, and though, if we were discussing the merits of design and the canons of taste, this might be considered a decline, still its influence on furniture was doubtless to produce more ease and luxury, more warmth and comfort, than would be possible if the outline of every article of useful furniture were decided by a rigid adherence to classical principles.  We have seen that this was more consonant with the public life of an Athenian; but the Romans, in the later period of the Empire, with their wealth, their extravagance, their slaves, their immorality and gross sensuality, lived in a splendour and with a prodigality that well accorded with the gorgeous colouring of Eastern hangings and embroideries, of rich carpets and comfortable cushions, of the lavish use of gold and silver, and meritricious and redundant ornament.

[Illustration:  Roman Couch, Generally of Bronze. (From an Antique Bas relief.)]

This slight sketch, brief and inadequate as it is, of a history of furniture from the earliest time of which we have any record, until from the extraordinary growth of the vast Roman Empire, the arts and manufactures of every country became as it were centralised and focussed in the palaces of the wealthy Romans, brings us down to the commencement of what has been deservedly called “the greatest event in history”—­the decline and fall of this enormous empire.  For fifteen generations, for some five hundred years, did this decay, this vast revolution, proceed to its conclusion.  Barbarian hosts settled down in provinces they had overrun and conquered, the old Pagan world died as it were, and the new Christian era dawned.  From the latter end of the second century until the last of the Western Caesars, in A.D. 476, it is, with the exception of a short interval when the strong hand of the great Theodosius stayed the avalanche of Rome’s invaders, one long story of the defeat and humiliation of the citizens of the greatest power the world has ever known.  It is a vast drama that the genius and patience of a Gibbon has alone been able to deal with, defying almost by its gigantic catastrophes and ever raging turbulence the pen of history to chronicle and arrange.  When the curtain rises on a new order of things, the age of Paganism has passed away, and the period of the Middle Ages will have commenced.

[Illustration:  A Roman Study.  Shewing Scrolls or Books in a “Scrinium;” also Lamp, Writing Tablets, etc.]

[Illustration:  The Roman Triclinium, or Dining Room.

The plan in the margin shews the position of guests; the place of honor was that which is indicated by “No. 1,” and that of the host by “No. 9.”

(The Illustration is taken from Dr. Jacob von Falke’s “Kunst im Hause.")]

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