Odd Craft, Complete eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 175 pages of information about Odd Craft, Complete.

“And where’s the money to do it with?” ses Peter.

Ginger ’adn’t thought of that, and it struck ’im all of a heap.  None of ’em seemed to be able to think of a way of getting the other ten shillings wot was wanted, and Ginger was so upset that ’e took no notice of the things Peter kept saying to ’im.

“Let’s go and ask to see ’em, and say we left a railway-ticket in the pocket,” ses Peter.

Isaac shook ’is ’ead.  “There’s on’y one way to do it,” he ses.  “We shall ’ave to pawn your clothes, Ginger, to get mine out with.”

“That’s the on’y way, Ginger,” ses Peter, brightening up.  “Now, wot’s the good o’ carrying on like that?  It’s no worse for you to be without your clothes for a little while than it was for pore old Isaac.”

It took ’em quite arf an hour afore they could get Ginger to see it.  First of all ’e wanted Peter’s clothes to be took instead of ’is, and when Peter pointed out that they was too shabby to fetch ten shillings ’e ‘ad a lot o’ nasty things to say about wearing such old rags, and at last, in a terrible temper, ’e took ’is clothes off and pitched ’em in a ’eap on the floor.

“If you ain’t back in arf an hour, Peter,” ’e ses, scowling at ’im, “you’ll ’ear from me, I can tell you.”

“Don’t you worry about that,” ses Isaac, with a smile.  “I’m going to take ’em.”

“You?” ses Ginger; “but you can’t.  You ain’t got no clothes.”

“I’m going to wear Peter’s,” ses Isaac, with a smile.

Peter asked ’im to listen to reason, but it was all no good.  He’d got the pawn-ticket, and at last Peter, forgetting all he’d said to Ginger Dick about using bad langwidge, took ’is clothes off, one by one, and dashed ’em on the floor, and told Isaac some of the things ’e thought of ’im.

The old man didn’t take any notice of ’im.  He dressed ’imself up very slow and careful in Peter’s clothes, and then ’e drove ’em nearly crazy by wasting time making ’is bed.

“Be as quick as you can, Isaac,” ses Ginger, at last; “think of us two a-sitting ’ere waiting for you.”

“I sha’n’t forget it,” ses Isaac, and ’e came back to the door after ’e’d gone arf-way down the stairs to ask ’em not to go out on the drink while ’e was away.

It was nine o’clock when he went, and at ha’-past nine Ginger began to get impatient and wondered wot ’ad ’appened to ’im, and when ten o’clock came and no Isaac they was both leaning out of the winder with blankets over their shoulders looking up the road.  By eleven o’clock Peter was in very low spirits and Ginger was so mad ’e was afraid to speak to ’im.

They spent the rest o’ that day ’anging out of the winder, but it was not till ha’-past four in the after-noon that Isaac, still wearing Peter’s clothes and carrying a couple of large green plants under ’is arm, turned into the road, and from the way ’e was smiling they thought it must be all right.

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Odd Craft, Complete from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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