Sakoontala or the Lost Ring eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 139 pages of information about Sakoontala or the Lost Ring.

[Sighing.]

I have but one resource.  Oh for another sight of the Idol of my soul!  I will seek her.

[Glancing at the sun.]

In all probability, as the sun’s heat is now at its height, [S’]akoontala is passing her time under the shade of the bowers on the banks of the Malini, attended by her maidens.  I will go and look for her there.

[Walking and looking about.]

I suspect the fair one has but just passed by this avenue of young trees.

  Here, as she tripped along, her fingers plucked
  The opening buds; these lacerated plants,
  Shorn of their fairest blossoms by her hand,
  Seem like dismembered trunks, whose recent wounds
  Are still unclosed; while from the bleeding socket
  Of many a severed stalk, the milky juice
  Still slowly trickles, and betrays her path.

[Feeling a breeze.]

What a delicious breeze meets me in this spot!

  Here may the zephyr, fragrant with the scent
  Of lotuses, and laden with the spray
  Caught from the waters of the rippling stream,
  Fold in its close embrace my fevered limbs.

[Walking and looking about.]

She must be somewhere in the neighbourhood of this arbour of overhanging creepers enclosed by plantations of cane;

[Looking down.]

  For at the entrance here I plainly see
  A line of footsteps printed in the sand. 
  Here are the fresh impressions of her feet;
  Their well-known outline faintly marked in front,
  More deeply towards the heel; betokening
  The graceful undulation of her gait[51].

I will peep through those branches.

[Walking and looking.  With transport.]

Ah! now my eyes are gratified by an entrancing sight.  Yonder is the beloved of my heart reclining on a rock strewn with flowers, and attended by her two friends.  How fortunate!  Concealed behind the leaves, I will listen to their conversation, without raising their suspicions.

[Stands concealed, and gazes at them.

[S’]AKOONTALA and her two attendants, holding fans in their hands, are discovered as described.

PRIYAMVADA AND ANASUYA.

[Fanning her.  In a tone of affection.

Dearest [S’]akoontala, is the breeze raised by these broad lotus-leaves refreshing to you?

[S’]AKOONTALA.

Dear friends, why should you trouble yourselves to fan me?

[PRIYAMVADA and ANASUYA look sorrowfully at one another.

KING.

[S’]akoontala seems indeed to be seriously ill.

[Thoughtfully.]

Can it be the intensity of the heat that has affected her? or does my heart suggest the true cause of her malady?

[Gazing at her passionately.]

Why should I doubt it?

  The maiden’s spotless bosom is o’erspread
  With cooling balsam; on her slender arm
  Her only bracelet, twined with lotus-stalks,
  Hangs loose and withered; her recumbent form
  Betokens languor.  Ne’er could noon-day sun
  Inflict such fair disorder on a maid—­
  No, love, and love alone, is here to blame.

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Project Gutenberg
Sakoontala or the Lost Ring from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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