The Glories of Ireland eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 379 pages of information about The Glories of Ireland.

Sigerson:  Bards of the Gael and Gall; O’Callaghan:  History of the Irish Brigades; Mitchel:  Life of Hugh O’Neill; Green:  The Making of Ireland and its Undoing, Irish Nationality, The Old Irish World; Taylor:  Life of Owen Roe O’Neill; Todhunter:  Life of Patrick Sarsfield; Hyde:  Love Songs of Connacht, Religious Songs of Connacht; O’Grady:  Bog of Stars, Flight of the Eagle; Ferguson:  Hibernian Nights’ Entertainment; Mitchel:  History of Ireland, in continuation of MacGeoghegan’s History.

THE ISLAND OF SAINTS AND SCHOLARS

By canon D’ALTON, M.R.I.A., LL.D.

Unlike the natives of Britain and Scotland, the Irish in pre-Christian times were not brought into contact with Roman institutions or Roman culture.  In consequence they created and developed a civilization of their own that was in some respects without equal.  They were far advanced in the knowledge of metal-work and shipbuilding; they engaged in commerce; they loved music and had an acquaintance with letters; and when disputes arose among them, these were settled in duly constituted courts of justice, presided over by a trained lawyer, called a brehon, instead of being settled by the stern arbitrament of force.  Druidism was their pagan creed.  They believed in the immortality and in the transmigration of souls; they worshipped the sun and moon, and they venerated mountains, rivers, and wells; and it would be difficult to find any ministers of religion who were held in greater awe than the Druids.

Commerce and war brought the Irish into contact with Britain and the continent, and thus was Christianity gradually introduced into the island.  Though its progress at first was not rapid, there were, by 431, several Christian churches in existence, and in that year Palladius, a Briton and a bishop, was sent by Pope Celestine to the Irish who already believed in Christ.  Discouraged and a failure, Palladius returned to Britain after a brief stay on his mission, and then, in 432, the same Pope sent St. Patrick, who became the Apostle of Ireland.

Because of the great work he did, St. Patrick is one of the prominent figures of history; and yet, to such an extent has the dust of time settled down on his life and acts that the place and year of his birth, the schools in which he was educated, and the year of his death, are all matters of dispute.  There is, however, no good reason to depart from the traditional account, which is, that the Apostle was born at Dumbarton in Scotland, in the year 372; that in 388 he was captured by the Irish king Niall, who had gone on a plundering raid into Scotland; that he was brought to Ireland and sold as a slave, and that as such he served a pagan chief named Milcho who lived in what is now the county of Antrim; that from Antrim he escaped and went back to his own country; that he had many visions urging him to return to Ireland and preach the Gospel there; that, believing these were from God, he went to France, and there was educated and ordained priest, and later consecrated bishop; and then, accompanied by several ecclesiastics, he was sent to Ireland.

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The Glories of Ireland from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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