The German Classics of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, Volume 04 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 463 pages of information about The German Classics of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, Volume 04.

Several characters are well-sustained.

JACKPUD.

Not a single one.

LEANDER.

Then, even if I concede else, the audience is well drawn in it.

JACKPUD.

An audience never has a character.

LEANDER.

I am almost amazed at this boldness.

JACKPUD (to the pit).

Isn’t he a foolish fellow?  Here we are, hand and glove with each other and sympathize in our views on taste, and he wishes to assert in opposition to my opinion, that at least the audience in Puss in Boots is well drawn.

FISCHER.

The audience?  Why no audience appears in the play.

JACKPUD.

That’s even better!  So, then, no audience is presented in it at all?

MUeLLER.

Why not a bit of it, unless he means the several kinds of fools that appear.

JACKPUD.

Now, do you see, scholar!  What these gentlemen down there are saying must certainly be true.

LEANDER.

I am getting confused, but still I won’t yield the victory to you.

[Enter HINZE.]

JACKPUD.

Sir Hunter, a word! (HINZE approaches, they whisper.)

HINZE.  If it’s nothing more than that. (He takes off his boots, climbs up the pole, then takes the hat, jumps down, then puts his boots on again.)

JACKPUD.

Victory!  Victory!

KING.

The deuce!  How clever the hunter is!

LEANDER.

I only regret that I have been vanquished by a fool, that learning must acknowledge foolishness as its superior.

KING.

Keep still; you wanted the hat, he wanted the hat; so again I see no difference.  But what have you brought, hunter?

HINZE.

The Count of Carabas commends himself most respectfully to your majesty and sends you these two partridges.

KING.

Too much! too much!  I am sinking under the burden of gratitude!  Long since should I have done my duty and visited him; today I will delay no longer.  Have my royal carriage prepared at once—­eight horses in front—­I want to go driving with my daughter.  You, Hunter, are to show us the way to the castle of the count.

[Exit with retinue.]

HINZE.  JACKPUDDING

HINZE.

What was your disputation about, anyhow?

JACKPUD.

I asserted that a certain play, which, moreover, I am not acquainted with at all, Puss in Boots, is a wretched play.

HINZE.

So?

JACKPUD.

Adieu, Sir Hunter.

[Exit.]

HINZE (alone).

I’m all in the dumps.  I, myself, helped the fool win a victory against a play in which I myself am taking the leading part.  Fate!  Fate!  Into what complications do you so often lead us mortals?  But be that as it may.  If I only succeed in putting my beloved Gottlieb on the throne, I will gladly forget all my other troubles.  The king wishes to visit the count?  Now that is another bad situation which I must clear up; now the great, important day has arrived on which I need you so particularly, you boots.  Now do not desert me; all must be determined today.

Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
The German Classics of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, Volume 04 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
Follow Us on Facebook