The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa Bk. 4 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 188 pages of information about The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa Bk. 4.

Vaisampayana said, “Thus addressed by Partha, Virata’s son, decked in ear-rings, alighted from the car, and climbed up that Sami tree reluctantly.  And staying on the car, Dhananjaya, that slayer of enemies, said unto him, ’Speedily bring thou down those bows from the top of the tree.’  And cutting off their wrappings first and then the ropes with which they were tied, the prince beheld the Gandiva there along with four other bows.  And as they were untied, the splendour of those bows radiant as the sun, began to shine with great effulgence like unto that of the planets about the time of their rising.  And beholding the forms of those bows, so like unto sighing snakes, he become afflicted with fear and in a moment the bristles of his body stood on their ends.  And touching those large bows of great splendour, Virata’s son, O king, thus spake unto Arjuna!”

SECTION XLII

“Uttara said, ’To what warrior of fame doth this excellent bow belong, on which are a hundred golden bosses and which hath such radiant ends?  Whose is this excellent bow of good sides and easy hold, on the staff of which shine golden elephants of such brightness?  Whose is this excellent bow, adorned with three scores of Indragopakas[43] of pure gold, placed on the back of the staff at proper intervals?  Whose is this excellent bow, furnished with three golden suns of great effulgence, blazing forth with such brilliancy?  Whose is this beautiful bow which is variegated with gold and gems, and on which are golden insects set with beautiful stones?  Whose are these arrows furnished with wing around, numbering a thousand, having golden heads, and cased in golden quivers?  Who owneth these large shafts, so thick, furnished with vulturine wings whetted on stone, yellowish in hue, sharp-pointed, well-tempered, and entirely made of iron?  Whose is this sable quiver,[44] bearing five images of tigers, which holdeth shafts intermined with boar-eared arrows altogether numbering ten?  Whose are these seven hundred arrows, long and thick, capable of drinking (the enemy’s) blood, and looking like the crescent-shaped moon?[45] Whose are these gold-crested arrows whetted on stones, the lower halves of which are well-furnished with wings of the hue of parrots’ feather and the upper halves, of well-tempered steels?[46] Whose is this excellent sword irresistible, and terrible to adversaries, with the mark of a toad on it, and pointed like a toad’s head?[47] Cased in variegated sheath of tiger-skin, whose is this large sword of excellent blade and variegated with gold and furnished with tinkling bells?  Whose is this handsome scimitar of polished blade and golden hilt?  Manufactured in the country of the Nishadas, irresistible, incapable of being broken, whose is this sword of polished blade in a scabbard of cow-skin?  Whose is this beautiful and long sword, sable in hue as the sky, mounted with gold, well-tempered, and cased in a sheath of goat-skin? 

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The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa Bk. 4 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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