The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa Bk. 4 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 188 pages of information about The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa Bk. 4.
with immeasurable prowess, went into the prince’s presence.  And like unto a she-elephant running after her young one, the princess possessed of large eyes followed that hero advancing with hasty steps like unto an elephant with rent temples.  And beholding him from a distance, the prince himself said, ’With thee as his charioteer, Dhananjaya the son of Kunti had gratified Agni at the Khandava forest and subjugated the whole world!  The Sairindhri hath spoken of thee to me.  She knoweth the Pandavas.  Do thou, therefore, O Vrihannala, hold, as thou didst, the reins of my steeds, desirous as I am of righting with the Kurus and rescuing my bovine wealth.  Thou wert formerly the beloved charioteer of Arjuna and it was with thee that that bull among the sons of Pandu had alone subjugated the whole earth!’ Thus addressed, Vrihannala replied unto the prince, saying, ’What ability have I to act as a charioteer in the field of battle?  If it is song or dance or musical instruments or such other things, I can entertain thee therewith, but where is my skill for becoming a charioteer?’

[39] The words in the original is pranayam, lit., love.  Nilakantha, however, explains it as meaning modesty, humility.  I think, Nilakantha is right.  The relations between Arjuna and the princess were like those between father and daughter.

“Uttara said, ’O Vrihannala, be thou a singer or a dancer, hold thou (for the present), without loss of time, the reins of my excellent steeds, mounting upon my car!’”

Vaisampayana continued, “Although that oppressor of foes, the son of Pandu, was acquainted with everything, yet in the presence of Uttara, he began to make many mistakes for the sake of fun.  And when he sought to put the coat of mail on his body by raising it upwards, the large-eyed maidens, beholding it, burst out into a loud laughter.  And seeing him quite ignorant of putting on armour, Uttara himself equipped Vrihannala with a costly coat of mail.  And casing his own person in an excellent armour of solar effulgence, and hoisting his standard bearing the figure of a lion, the prince caused Vrihannala to become his charioteer.  And with Vrihannala to hold his reins, the hero set out, taking with him many costly bows and a large number of beautiful arrows.  And his friend, Uttara and her maidens then said unto Vrihannala, ’Do thou, O Vrihannala, bring for our dolls (when thou comest back) various kinds of good and fine cloths after vanquishing the Kurus assembled for battle of whom Bhishma and Drona are foremost!’ Thus addressed, Partha the son of Pandu, in a voice deep as the roar of the clouds, smilingly said unto that bevy of fair maidens.  ’If thus Uttara can vanquish those mighty warriors in battle, I will certainly bring excellent and beautiful cloths.’”

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The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa Bk. 4 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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