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Narrative of a Survey of the Intertropical and Western Coasts of Australia eBook

Philip Parker King
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 494 pages of information about Narrative of a Survey of the Intertropical and Western Coasts of Australia.

Sun :  Laran-gai, or Car-ran-ghie :  Gallan (Forster) :  Djaat :  Goona, Coing, or Con-do-in :  Bun-nail, or Mo-mat :  — :  Too-nigh, or Win-gin :  -.

Water :  Lucka, or Lucko :  Poorai (Forster) :  — :  Ba-doo :  Ajung- :  — :  Bah-do :  -.

Stone :  Punda :  Wal-bah :  — :  Keba :  Wy-juck :  — :  — :  -.

Kangaroo :  Loi-tyo :  Men-u-ah, Kan-goo-roo (Cook) :  Beango :  Tungo, Patagorang, Bag-gar-ray, Wal-li-bah, Wal-lar-roo, Bou-rou, Barro-melon, Betong, Wy-rung, Pademalion :  — :  — :  Womboy, Pool-cot (tame), Mah-koke (the Pademalion of Port Jackson) :  Raguar.

Throwing-stick :  Kail lepo :  Melpairo, or Melpier (Forster) :  Me-a-ra :  Wo-me-rah :  — :  — :  — :  -.

Nipples (of a man) :  — :  Coy-o-ber-rah, Cayo (Cook) :  Be-ep :  Mou-tral :  - :  — :  — :  Nerrinook.

Dog :  — :  Cotta, or Kota :  Tiara :  Teingo, Dingo, Worregal :  Med-di-gen, War-ri-gal :  — :  — :  -.

Nails :  — :  Kolke :  Pera :  Currungal, or Car-rung-un :  — :  — :  — :  -.

Beard :  — :  Wol-lar :  Nyanuck :  Chinis, or Wallo :  — :  Anany :  — :  Ru-ing.

Mouth :  — :  — :  Tatah :  Karga :  — :  Chuang :  Wel’-leck :  -.

Fire :  — :  — :  — :  Gwee-yong, or Too-yong :  Canby :  Warrenur :  Cor-yal :  Lope.

Membrum virile :  — :  — :  Yaw-de-wit :  — :  — :  — :  Cool-kah :  Lune.

Head :  — :  Wageegee (Forster) :  — :  Cob-bra :  Ulangar, or Nattang :  Cah-brah :  — :  -.

The preceding brief collection, of words used by the natives in various parts of the Coasts of Australia and Van Diemen’s Land, has been inserted to show the great dissimilarity that exists in the languages of the several tribes:  and it may be remarked, that of thirty-three objects, one only, the Eye, is expressed by nearly the same term at each place.  In this list, it is true, there is a striking resemblance between the terms used to signify the hair at Port Jackson, namely, dewarra, or kewarra, or gewarroo, and those which denote the same thing in the language of some of the islands of the Eastern Seas; such, for instance, as arouroo or hooroo-hooroo of the Society Islands; lo-ooroo of the Friendly Islands; hooroo of New Zealand; and, perhaps, oouho of the Marquesas:* but at New Caledonia, which is situated between these places and Port Jackson, the same thing is expressed by poon, a sound totally distinct.  And to render the anomaly still more decisive, it is only necessary to remark, that, within two hundred miles of Port Jackson, the natives of three tribes, Port Macquarie.  Burrah-Burrah, and Limestone Creek, signify the hair, by the words wollack, mundar, and bulla-ye-ga.

(Footnote.  Forster Observations page 283.)

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