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Philip Parker King
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 494 pages of information about Narrative of a Survey of the Intertropical and Western Coasts of Australia.
as in insertion and direction, with the ovula.  The supposition, that in such cases all the lobes of each squama are cells of one and the same anthera, receives but little support either from the origin and arrangement of the lobes themselves, or from the structure of other phaenogamous plants:  the only cases of apparent, though doubtful, analogy that I can at present recollect occurring in Aphyteia, and perhaps in some Cucurbitaceae.

(Footnote.  In communicating specimens of this plant to the late M. Richard, for his intended monograph of Coniferae, I added some remarks on its structure, agreeing with those here made.  I at the same time requested that, if he objected to Mr. Salisbury’s Belis as liable to be confounded with Bellis, the genus might be named Cunninghamia, to commemorate the merits of Mr. James Cunningham, an excellent observer in his time, by whom this plant was discovered; and in honour of Mr. Allan Cunningham, the very deserving botanist who accompanied Mr. Oxley in his first expedition into the interior of New South Wales, and Captain King in all his voyages of survey of the Coasts of New Holland.)

That part of my subject, therefore, which relates to the analogy between the male and female flowers in Cycadeae and Coniferae, I consider the least satisfactory, both in regard to the immediate question of the existence of an anomalous ovarium in these families, and to the hypothesis repeatedly referred to, of the origin of the sexual organs of all phaenogamous plants.

In concluding this digression, I have to express my regret that it should have so far exceeded the limits proper for its introduction into the present work.  In giving an account, however, of the genus of plants to which it is annexed, I had to describe a structure, of whose nature and importance it was necessary I should show myself aware; and circumstances have occurred while I was engaged in preparing this account, which determined me to enter much more fully into the subject than I had originally intended.

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APPENDIX C.

AN ACCOUNT OF SOME GEOLOGICAL SPECIMENS, COLLECTED BY CAPTAIN P.P.  KING,
IN HIS SURVEY OF THE COASTS OF AUSTRALIA, AND BY ROBERT BROWN, ESQUIRE,
ON THE SHORES OF THE GULF OF CARPENTARIA, DURING THE VOYAGE OF CAPTAIN
FLINDERS.

BY WILLIAM HENRY FITTON, M.D., F.R.S., V.P.G.S.

[READ BEFORE THE GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF LONDON, 4TH NOVEMBER, 1825.]

The following enumeration of specimens from the coasts of Australia, commences, with the survey of Captain King, on the eastern shore, about the latitude of twenty-two degrees, proceeding northward and westward:  and as the shores of the Gulf of Carpentaria, previously surveyed by Captain Flinders, were passed over by Captain King, Mr. Brown, who accompanied the former, has been so good as to allow the specimens collected by himself in that part of New Holland, to supply the

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