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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 79 pages of information about The value of a praying mother.

She had taught them that when any trouble arose between them, they were to kneel in prayer and ask God to help the one who had done wrong.  Once she heard Bessie say, “Louise, I have prayed for you three times, and I believe I shall have to pray for you again.”  Louise was not a bad child; she had as sweet and happy a disposition as Bessie; but, as with all small children, little difficulties arose between them.

Wishing to know what her two little girls would do on such an occasion, she watched them.  Bessie quietly took her little sister’s hand, lead her aside, and knelt with her in prayer.  Then with all earnestness she prayed, “O Lord, help Louise to to be good, for Jesus’ sake.  Amen.”  The prayer, though short, was effectual; for both went back to their play with happy faces, and they had no more trouble that day.

CHAPTER III.

EARLY TRAINING.

As the daily teaching continued, Mrs. Worthington taught her children many helpful lessons.  She told them of the great necessity of a Savior and of his mission to humanity.  She taught them how God looked upon disobedience, and always illustrated her talks with interesting Bible stories and their every-day experiences.  In this way she taught them not only the evil effects of wrong-doing but also the sure reward of right-doing.

One summer, while the family was spending their vacation in Michigan at the pretty country home of an aunt, something happened that helped the children to apprehend their mother’s meaning.  This incident, although in some measure painful to Mrs. Worthington, impressed the lesson upon their young minds almost better than anything else could have.

The house was situated upon a hill that sloped gradually down to the shore of a lake.  In many ways this lake was very attractive, especially to the two little girls, who were then at the ages of two and four years.  Mrs. Worthington carefully warned the children of the danger of playing near the lake shore; but, not realizing the greatness of their temptation, she trusted them too far.  Time after time they made their way down to the water’s edge.  Something must be done; but what?

One morning Mr. Worthington noticed his little daughters standing in front of the house.  Although he could not hear their words, he clearly perceived that they were talking about a trip to the forbidden lake.  They hesitated some time, but at last walked slowly down the hillside to the lake.  Again they hesitated.  Finally descending the steps of the boat-house, they stepped into the sparkling water.  How dainty the ripples about their feet, and how clear the water!

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