The value of a praying mother eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 79 pages of information about The value of a praying mother.

The next morning she went to the door and looked at the sky.  The day was perfect.  The sun was shining brightly, and a cool, gentle breeze was blowing.  Just one tiny cloud was in the sky, and that seemed to be floating toward the sun.  As she watched the cloud, she saw it gradually increase in size, and at last down came the rain in great drops.  Nothing further was needed to convince Bessie that God wanted her to remain at home; and now her staying was no longer a cross to her.

She ran to her father and explained that God did not want her to go, telling him about her prayer and its answer.  Her childish words and simple faith touched her father’s proud heart, but all he said was, “It’s all right, Bessie; but you’ll go down to the landing and say good-by to your friends, won’t you?”

As she told the girls why she could not go with them and watched the gay party leave the shore, she was not sad, but happy.  She kept thinking how kind the dear Lord had been to answer her prayer so wonderfully.  When bedtime came, she rested sweetly, having no wounded conscience to trouble or accuse her.

But how about the excursion party?  They had an ideal trip on Lake Michigan, attended the show, and started to return.  The breeze that had been so gently blowing through the day began to increase at sunset, and by the late hour of their return it had become a gale.  But not realizing the fierceness of the storm, they started home.  When they reached their own harbor, they found that they could not enter with safety; so they anchored the boat and spent the remainder of the night on the wildly tossing waves.  In the morning the wind gradually died away, and the weary, seasick crowd made their way home.

When Bessie learned of their serious experience, she appreciated more than ever the Lord’s goodness in leading her to stay at home.

CHAPTER IX.

SELF-CONTROL.

Mrs. Worthington was greatly encouraged when she saw what a blessing her little girl had received from what appeared to be a sore trial.  She felt that the time was opportune to plant the seed of self-control within the young heart.  In a little while she found an opportunity to begin.

“Bessie,” she began when ready for the talk, “I have some important things to tell you today.  I wish to speak of your future.  There comes a time in the life of every girl when she must change from childhood to womanhood; she can not always remain a child.  Until this time arrives, she is very dependent and must lean entirely upon her parents’ advice; but as her mind begins to mature, she should be taught the necessity of weighing matters well and of finding out God’s will.

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The value of a praying mother from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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