Gargantua and Pantagruel eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 952 pages of information about Gargantua and Pantagruel.
So thou shalt, said he, and must, whether thou wouldst or no, and withal render and yield up thy soul to all the devils in hell; then suddenly gave them dronos, that is, so many knocks, thumps, raps, dints, thwacks, and bangs, as sufficed to warn Pluto of their coming and despatch them a-going.  If any was so rash and full of temerity as to resist him to his face, then was it he did show the strength of his muscles, for without more ado he did transpierce him, by running him in at the breast, through the mediastine and the heart.  Others, again, he so quashed and bebumped, that, with a sound bounce under the hollow of their short ribs, he overturned their stomachs so that they died immediately.  To some, with a smart souse on the epigaster, he would make their midriff swag, then, redoubling the blow, gave them such a homepush on the navel that he made their puddings to gush out.  To others through their ballocks he pierced their bumgut, and left not bowel, tripe, nor entrail in their body that had not felt the impetuosity, fierceness, and fury of his violence.  Believe, that it was the most horrible spectacle that ever one saw.  Some cried unto Sanct Barbe, others to St. George.  O the holy Lady Nytouch, said one, the good Sanctess; O our Lady of Succours, said another, help, help!  Others cried, Our Lady of Cunaut, of Loretto, of Good Tidings, on the other side of the water St. Mary Over.  Some vowed a pilgrimage to St. James, and others to the holy handkerchief at Chamberry, which three months after that burnt so well in the fire that they could not get one thread of it saved.  Others sent up their vows to St. Cadouin, others to St. John d’Angely, and to St. Eutropius of Xaintes.  Others again invoked St. Mesmes of Chinon, St. Martin of Candes, St. Clouaud of Sinays, the holy relics of Laurezay, with a thousand other jolly little sancts and santrels.  Some died without speaking, others spoke without dying; some died in speaking, others spoke in dying.  Others shouted as loud as they could Confession, Confession, Confiteor, Miserere, In manus!  So great was the cry of the wounded, that the prior of the abbey with all his monks came forth, who, when they saw these poor wretches so slain amongst the vines, and wounded to death, confessed some of them.  But whilst the priests were busied in confessing them, the little monkies ran all to the place where Friar John was, and asked him wherein he would be pleased to require their assistance.  To which he answered that they should cut the throats of those he had thrown down upon the ground.  They presently, leaving their outer habits and cowls upon the rails, began to throttle and make an end of those whom he had already crushed.  Can you tell with what instruments they did it?  With fair gullies, which are little hulchbacked demi-knives, the iron tool whereof is two inches long, and the wooden handle one inch thick, and three inches in length, wherewith the little boys in our country cut
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Gargantua and Pantagruel from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.