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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 952 pages of information about Gargantua and Pantagruel.

Chapter 3.XLV.—­How Panurge taketh advice of Triboulet

Chapter 3.XLVI.—­How Pantagruel and Panurge diversely interpret the words of Triboulet

Chapter 3.XLVII.—­How Pantagruel and Panurge resolved to make a visit to the Oracle of the Holy Bottle

Chapter 3.XLVIII.—­How Gargantua showeth that the children ought not to marry without the special knowledge and advice of their fathers and mothers

Chapter 3.XLIX.—­How Pantagruel did put himself in a readiness to go to sea; and of the herb named Pantagruelion

Chapter 3.L.—­How the famous Pantagruelion ought to be prepared and wrought

Chapter 3.LI.—­Why it is called Pantagruelion, and of the admirable virtues thereof

Chapter 3.LII.—­How a certain kind of Pantagruelion is of that nature that the fire is not able to consume it

THE FOURTH BOOK.

The Translator’s Preface

The Author’s Epistle Dedicatory

The Author’s Prologue

Chapter 4.I.—­How Pantagruel went to sea to visit the oracle of Bacbuc, alias the Holy Bottle

Chapter 4.II.—­How Pantagruel bought many rarities in the island of
Medamothy

Chapter 4.III.—­How Pantagruel received a letter from his father Gargantua, and of the strange way to have speedy news from far distant places

Chapter 4.IV.—­How Pantagruel writ to his father Gargantua, and sent him several curiosities

Chapter 4.V.—­How Pantagruel met a ship with passengers returning from Lantern-land

Chapter 4.VI.—­How, the fray being over, Panurge cheapened one of Dingdong’s sheep

Chapter 4.VII.—­Which if you read you’ll find how Panurge bargained with Dingdong

Chapter 4.VIII.—­How Panurge caused Dingdong and his sheep to be drowned in the sea

Chapter 4.IX.—­How Pantagruel arrived at the island of Ennasin, and of the strange ways of being akin in that country

Chapter 4.X.—­How Pantagruel went ashore at the island of Chely, where he saw King St. Panigon

Chapter 4.XI.—­Why monks love to be in kitchens

Chapter 4.XII.—­How Pantagruel passed by the land of Pettifogging, and of the strange way of living among the Catchpoles

Chapter 4.XIII.—­How, like Master Francis Villon, the Lord of Basche commended his servants

Chapter 4.XIV.—­A further account of catchpoles who were drubbed at Basche’s house

Chapter 4.XV.—­How the ancient custom at nuptials is renewed by the catchpole

Chapter 4.XVI.—­How Friar John made trial of the nature of the catchpoles

Chapter 4.XVII.—­How Pantagruel came to the islands of Tohu and Bohu; and of the strange death of Wide-nostrils, the swallower of windmills

Chapter 4.XVIII.—­How Pantagruel met with a great storm at sea

Chapter 4.XIX.—­What countenances Panurge and Friar John kept during the storm

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