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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 952 pages of information about Gargantua and Pantagruel.
jurandi) I shall not raise her again by my crying:  she is well, she is in paradise at least, if she be no higher:  she prayeth to God for us, she is happy, she is above the sense of our miseries, nor can our calamities reach her.  What though she be dead, must not we also die?  The same debt which she hath paid hangs over our heads; nature will require it of us, and we must all of us some day taste of the same sauce.  Let her pass then, and the Lord preserve the survivors; for I must now cast about how to get another wife.  But I will tell you what you shall do, said he to the midwives, in France called wise women (where be they, good folks?  I cannot see them):  Go you to my wife’s interment, and I will the while rock my son; for I find myself somewhat altered and distempered, and should otherwise be in danger of falling sick; but drink one good draught first, you will be the better for it.  And believe me, upon mine honour, they at his request went to her burial and funeral obsequies.  In the meanwhile, poor Gargantua staying at home, and willing to have somewhat in remembrance of her to be engraven upon her tomb, made this epitaph in the manner as followeth.

  Dead is the noble Badebec,
  Who had a face like a rebeck;
  A Spanish body, and a belly
  Of Switzerland; she died, I tell ye,
  In childbirth.  Pray to God, that her
  He pardon wherein she did err. 
  Here lies her body, which did live
  Free from all vice, as I believe,
    And did decease at my bedside,
    The year and day in which she died.

Chapter 2.IV.

Of the infancy of Pantagruel.

I find by the ancient historiographers and poets that divers have been born in this world after very strange manners, which would be too long to repeat; read therefore the seventh chapter of Pliny, if you have so much leisure.  Yet have you never heard of any so wonderful as that of Pantagruel; for it is a very difficult matter to believe, how in the little time he was in his mother’s belly he grew both in body and strength.  That which Hercules did was nothing, when in his cradle he slew two serpents, for those serpents were but little and weak, but Pantagruel, being yet in the cradle, did far more admirable things, and more to be amazed at.  I pass by here the relation of how at every one of his meals he supped up the milk of four thousand and six hundred cows, and how, to make him a skillet to boil his milk in, there were set a-work all the braziers of Somure in Anjou, of Villedieu in Normandy, and of Bramont in Lorraine.  And they served in this whitepot-meat to him in a huge great bell, which is yet to be seen in the city of Bourges in Berry, near the palace, but his teeth were already so well grown, and so strengthened with vigour, that of the said bell he bit off a great morsel, as very plainly doth appear till this hour.

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