The Illustrated London Reading Book eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 275 pages of information about The Illustrated London Reading Book.
confine me there. 
    ’Tis past conjecture; all things rise in proof. 
    While o’er my limbs sleep’s soft dominion spread,
    What though my soul fantastic measures trod
    O’er fairy fields, or mourn’d along the gloom
    Of pathless woods, or down the craggy steep
    Hurl’d headlong, swam with pain the mantled pool,
    Or scaled the cliff, or danced on hollow winds
    With antic shapes, wild natives of the brain! 
    Her ceaseless flight, though devious, speaks her nature
    Of subtler essence than the trodden clod: 
    Active, aerial, towering, unconfined,
    Unfetter’d with her gross companion’s fall. 
    Even silent night proclaims my soul immortal: 
    Even silent night proclaims eternal day! 
    For human weal Heaven husbands all events;
    Dull sleep instructs, nor sport vain dreams in vain.

    YOUNG.

* * * * *

FAREWELL.

[Illustration:  Letter N.]

    Nay, shrink not from that word “Farewell!”
    As if ’twere friendship’s final knell—­
      Such fears may prove but vain: 
    So changeful is life’s fleeting day,
    Whene’er we sever, Hope may say,
    We part to meet again!

    E’en the last parting earth can know,
    Brings not unutterable woe
      To souls that heav’nward soar: 
    For humble Faith, with steadfast eye,
    Points to a brighter world on high,
    Where hearts, that here at parting sigh,
    May meet—­to part no more!

    BARTON.

[Illustration]

* * * * *

VOCABULARY OF WORDS USED IN THE ILLUSTRATED LONDON READING BOOK.

* * * * *

[We have considered that it would be useful to the young reader to have a ready means of reference, in the READING BOOK itself, to all unusual words of one syllable, and all the words of two syllables and above, that occur in the various lessons.  In the following pages will be found, properly accentuated, all the more difficult polysyllables, with their meanings, derived from Johnson, Walker, and other competent authorities.]

* * * * *

ABA’NDON, v.a. give up; resign, or quit; forsake; leave

ABI’LITY, s. capacity; qualification; power

A’BJECT, a. mean; being of no hope or regard; destitute

ABLU’TION, s. the act of cleansing or washing clean; water used in
    washing

ABO’LISH, v.a. make void; put an end to; destroy

ABO’UND, v.n. have in great plenty; be in great plenty

ABRE’AST, ad. side by side

ABRU’PTLY, ad. hastily; suddenly; without the due forms of preparation

Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
The Illustrated London Reading Book from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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