Forgot your password?  

Resources for students & teachers

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 130 pages of information about A Peep into Toorkisthhan.

Here a young woman came to our tent asking permission to avail herself of our protection, as she was proceeding to the frontiers of Toorkisth[=a]n to purchase slave girls for the Cabul market.  She accompanied us to Bamee[=a]n, and there remained.  I heard afterwards that she did not succeed according to her anticipations, and that on her return to Cabul she died of fever.  Our English ideas of slavery drawn from our knowledge of the varied sufferings endured by the thousands who are annually exported from the western shores of Africa, are opposite to those entertained in the east even by the victims themselves.  The Asiatic and African slave are alike in name alone; the treatment of the latter in those parts of America where, spite of the progress of civilization and the advancement of true principles of philanthropy over the world, slavery is still tolerated and encouraged, has been too well and too often described for me to venture a word of my own opinion, but in Asia, in many cases, the loss of liberty is hardly felt.

The situation of the domestic slave of Egypt (though, strictly speaking, he must be classed under the head of “African”) is analogous to that observable generally in the east; and I form my opinion partly from an anecdote related to me by my friend Captain Westmacott, of the 37th Native Infantry, who was killed in the retreat from Cabul, which I will venture to repeat as an illustration.  He was proceeding by the overland route from England to India, and remained some time in Egypt to view its splendid antiquities.  On making inquiries with the object of procuring servants, he was informed that he had better purchase slaves.  The civilized notions of my friend revolted at the idea, but he was assured that it was a method very generally adopted, as he would find it extremely difficult to hire servants, and if successful, they would prove the veriest rascals on the face of the earth.  He reluctantly consented, and had them purchased.  On his departure for India he summoned his slaves, and informed them that as they had behaved themselves well he would give them their freedom.  They looked astounded and burst into tears, reminding him that instead of being kind to them he had shewn cruelty, “for where,” said they, “shall we go now?  Who will have anything to say to us?  We shall starve and die; but if your highness will sell us again, we shall be well fed and clothed.”  I confess I do not see why the servants, if they really were so anxious to return to slavery, should not have sold themselves, and pocketed their own value.  Throughout Afghanist[=a]n a slave is treated as an humble friend, and is generally found to be faithful and trustworthy.

CHAPTER IV.

Follow Us on Facebook