Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa Bk. 3 Pt. 1 eBook

Krishna Dwaipayana Vyasa
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 454 pages of information about Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa Bk. 3 Pt. 1.
mighty cannibal, possessed with rage, caught hold of Bhima’s hand with his own and clenching fast his other hand and making it hard as the thunder-bolt of Indra, suddenly struck Bhima a blow that descended with the force of lightning.  His hand having been seized by the Rakshasa, Vrikodara, without being able to brook it, flew into a rage.  Then a dreadful combat took place between Bhimasena and Hidimva, both skilled in all weapons and which was like unto the encounter of Vasava with Vritra.  And, O sinless one, after sporting with the Rakshasa for a long while the powerful Bhima of mighty energy slew the cannibal when the latter had become weak with exertion.  Then having slain Hidimva, and taking (his sister) Hidimva at their head, of whom was (subsequently) born Ghatotkacha, Bhima and his brothers went away.  Then all those repressers of their foes, accompanied by their mother and surrounded by many Brahmanas proceeded towards Ekachakra.  In the matter of this their journey, Vyasa ever engaged in their welfare had become their counsellor.  Then arriving at Ekachakra, the Pandavas of rigid vows there also slew a mighty cannibal, Vaka by name, terrible as Hidimva himself.  And having slain that fierce cannibal, Bhima that foremost of smiters, went with all his brothers to the capital of Drupada.  And, O Krishna, as thou hadst acquired Rukmim, the daughter of Bhishmaka, even so Savyasachin, while residing there, obtained me!  O slayer of Madhu, Arjuna won me in the Swayamvara, having performed a feat difficult of achievement by others and having fought also with the assembled kings!

“’Thus, O Krishna, afflicted with numerous griefs, and in great distress, am I living, with Dhaumya at our head, but deprived of the company of the adorable Kunti!  Why do these that are gifted with strength and possessed of the prowess of the lion, sit indifferently, beholding me thus afflicted by enemies so despicable?  Suffering such wrongs at the hands of wicked and evil-doing foes of small strength, am I to burn in grief so long?  Born I was in a great race, coming into the world in an extraordinary way!  I am also the beloved wife of the Pandavas, and the daughter-in-law of the illustrious Pandu!  The foremost of women and devoted to my husbands, even I, O Krishna, was seized by hair, O slayer of Madhu, in the sight of the Pandavas, each of whom is like an Indra himself!’

“Saying this the mild-speeched Krishna hid her face with her soft hands like the buds of lotus, and began to weep.  And the tears of Panchali begot of grief washed her deep, plump and graceful breasts crowned with auspicious marks.  And wiping her eyes and sighing frequently she said these words angrily and in a choked voice, ’Husbands, or sons, or friends, or brothers, or father, have I none!  Nor have I thee, O thou slayer of Madhu, for ye all, beholding me treated so cruelly by inferior foes, sit still unmoved!  My grief at Karna’s ridicule is incapable of being assuaged!  On these grounds I deserve to be ever protected by thee, O Kesava, viz., our relationship, thy respect (for me), our friendship, and thy lordship (over me).’”

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Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa Bk. 3 Pt. 1 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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