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Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa Bk. 3 Pt. 1 eBook

Krishna Dwaipayana Vyasa
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 454 pages of information about Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa Bk. 3 Pt. 1.

“Vidura said, ’Listen to the story of that feat of Bhimasena of superhuman achievements!  I have often heard of it in course of my conversation with the Pandavas (while I was with them).  O foremost of kings, defeated at dice the Pandavas departed from hence and travelling for three days and nights they at length reached those woods that go by the name of Kamyaka.  O king, just after the dreadful hour of midnight when all nature is asleep, when man-eating Rakshasas of terrible deeds begin to wander, the ascetics and the cowherds and other rangers of the forest used to shun the woods of Kamyaka and fly to a distance from fear of cannibals.  And, O Bharata, as the Pandavas were at this hour entering those woods a fearful Rakshasa of flaming eyes appeared before them with a lighted brand, obstructing their path.  And with outstretched arms and terrible face, he stood obstructing the way on which those perpetuators of the Kuru race were proceeding.  With eight teeth standing out, with eyes of coppery hue, and with the hair of his head blazing and standing erect, the fiend looked like a mass of clouds reflecting the rays of the sun or mingled with lightning flashes and graced with flocks of cranes underneath on their wings.  And uttering frightful yells and roaring like a mass of clouds charged with rain, the fiend began to spread the illusion proper to his species.  Hearing that terrible roar, birds along with other creatures that live on land or in water, began to drop down in all directions, uttering cries of fear.  And in consequence of the deer and the leopards and the buffaloes and the bears flying about in all directions, it seemed as if the forest itself was in motion.  And swayed by the wind raised by the sighs of the Rakshasa, creepers growing at a great distance seemed to embrace the trees with their arms of coppery leaves.  And at that moment, a violent wind began to blow, and the sky became darkened with the dust that covered it.  And as grief is the greatest enemy of the object of the five senses, even so appeared before the Pandavas that unknown foe of theirs.  And beholding the Pandavas from a distance clad in black deer-skins, the Rakshasa obstructed their passage through the forest even like the Mainaka mountain.  And at the sight of him never seen before the lotus-eyed Krishna, agitated with fear, closed her eyes.  And she whose braids had been dishevelled by the hand of Dussasana, stationed in the midst of the five Pandavas, looked like a stream chafing amid five hills.  And seeing her overwhelmed with fear the five Pandavas supported her as the five senses influenced by desire adhere to the pleasures relating to their objects.  And Dhaumya of great (ascetic) energy, in the presence of the sons of Pandu, destroyed the fearful illusion that had been spread by the Rakshasa, by applying various mantras, calculated to destroy the Rakshasa.  And beholding his illusion dispelled, the mighty Rakshasa of crooked ways, capable of assuming

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