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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 165 pages of information about Lair of the White Worm.

Without warning, the psychic battle between the two individualities began afresh.  This time both the positive and negative causes were all in favour of the man.  The woman was alone and in bad spirits, unsupported; nothing at all was in her favour except the memory of the two victorious contests; whereas the man, though unaided, as before, by either Lady Arabella or Oolanga, was in full strength, well rested, and in flourishing circumstances.  It was not, therefore, to be wondered at that his native dominance of character had full opportunity of asserting itself.  He began his preliminary stare with a conscious sense of power, and, as it appeared to have immediate effect on the girl, he felt an ever-growing conviction of ultimate victory.

After a little Lilla’s resolution began to flag.  She felt that the contest was unequal—­that she was unable to put forth her best efforts.  As she was an unselfish person, she could not fight so well in her own battle as in that of someone whom she loved and to whom she was devoted.  Edgar saw the relaxing of the muscles of face and brow, and the almost collapse of the heavy eyelids which seemed tumbling downward in sleep.  Lilla made gallant efforts to brace her dwindling powers, but for a time unsuccessfully.  At length there came an interruption, which seemed like a powerful stimulant.  Through the wide window she saw Lady Arabella enter the plain gateway of the farm, and advance towards the hall door.  She was clad as usual in tight-fitting white, which accentuated her thin, sinuous figure.

The sight did for Lilla what no voluntary effort could have done.  Her eyes flashed, and in an instant she felt as though a new life had suddenly developed within her.  Lady Arabella’s entry, in her usual unconcerned, haughty, supercilious way, heightened the effect, so that when the two stood close to each other battle was joined.  Mr. Caswall, too, took new courage from her coming, and all his masterfulness and power came back to him.  His looks, intensified, had more obvious effect than had been noticeable that day.  Lilla seemed at last overcome by his dominance.  Her face became red and pale—­violently red and ghastly pale—­by rapid turns.  Her strength seemed gone.  Her knees collapsed, and she was actually sinking on the floor, when to her surprise and joy Mimi came into the room, running hurriedly and breathing heavily.

Lilla rushed to her, and the two clasped hands.  With that, a new sense of power, greater than Lilla had ever seen in her, seemed to quicken her cousin.  Her hand swept the air in front of Edgar Caswall, seeming to drive him backward more and more by each movement, till at last he seemed to be actually hurled through the door which Mimi’s entrance had left open, and fell at full length on the gravel path without.

Then came the final and complete collapse of Lilla, who, without a sound, sank down on the floor.

CHAPTER XXVI—­FACE TO FACE

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