Lair of the White Worm eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 165 pages of information about Lair of the White Worm.

“You may think, Adam, that all this is imagination on my part, especially as I have never seen any of them.  So it is, but imagination based on deep study.  I have made use of all I know or can surmise logically regarding this strange race.  With such strange compelling qualities, is it any wonder that there is abroad an idea that in the race there is some demoniac possession, which tends to a more definite belief that certain individuals have in the past sold themselves to the Devil?

“But I think we had better go to bed now.  We have a lot to get through to-morrow, and I want you to have your brain clear, and all your susceptibilities fresh.  Moreover, I want you to come with me for an early walk, during which we may notice, whilst the matter is fresh in our minds, the peculiar disposition of this place—­not merely your grand-uncle’s estate, but the lie of the country around it.  There are many things on which we may seek—­and perhaps find—­enlightenment.  The more we know at the start, the more things which may come into our view will develop themselves.”

CHAPTER III—­DIANA’S GROVE

Curiosity took Adam Salton out of bed in the early morning, but when he had dressed and gone downstairs; he found that, early as he was, Sir Nathaniel was ahead of him.  The old gentleman was quite prepared for a long walk, and they started at once.

Sir Nathaniel, without speaking, led the way to the east, down the hill.  When they had descended and risen again, they found themselves on the eastern brink of a steep hill.  It was of lesser height than that on which the Castle was situated; but it was so placed that it commanded the various hills that crowned the ridge.  All along the ridge the rock cropped out, bare and bleak, but broken in rough natural castellation.  The form of the ridge was a segment of a circle, with the higher points inland to the west.  In the centre rose the Castle, on the highest point of all.  Between the various rocky excrescences were groups of trees of various sizes and heights, amongst some of which were what, in the early morning light, looked like ruins.  These—­whatever they were—­were of massive grey stone, probably limestone rudely cut—­if indeed they were not shaped naturally.  The fall of the ground was steep all along the ridge, so steep that here and there both trees and rocks and buildings seemed to overhang the plain far below, through which ran many streams.

Sir Nathaniel stopped and looked around, as though to lose nothing of the effect.  The sun had climbed the eastern sky and was making all details clear.  He pointed with a sweeping gesture, as though calling Adam’s attention to the extent of the view.  Having done so, he covered the ground more slowly, as though inviting attention to detail.  Adam was a willing and attentive pupil, and followed his motions exactly, missing—­or trying to miss—­nothing.

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Lair of the White Worm from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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