Lair of the White Worm eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 165 pages of information about Lair of the White Worm.

“That is so!”

“Then there were other matters of untruth.  That, for instance, of the ermine collar embroidered with emeralds.  If an understandable reason be required for this, it would be to draw attention away from the green lights which were seen in the room, and especially in the well-hole.  Any unprejudiced person would accept the green lights to be the eyes of a great snake, such as tradition pointed to living in the well-hole.  In fine, therefore, Lady Arabella wanted the general belief to be that there was no snake of the kind in Diana’s Grove.  For my own part, I don’t believe in a partial liar—­this art does not deal in veneer; a liar is a liar right through.  Self-interest may prompt falsity of the tongue; but if one prove to be a liar, nothing that he says can ever be believed.  This leads us to the conclusion that because she said or inferred that there was no snake, we should look for one—­and expect to find it, too.

“Now let me digress.  I live, and have for many years lived, in Derbyshire, a county more celebrated for its caves than any other county in England.  I have been through them all, and am familiar with every turn of them; as also with other great caves in Kentucky, in France, in Germany, and a host of other places—­in many of these are tremendously deep caves of narrow aperture, which are valued by intrepid explorers, who descend narrow gullets of abysmal depth—­and sometimes never return.  In many of the caverns in the Peak I am convinced that some of the smaller passages were used in primeval times as the lairs of some of the great serpents of legend and tradition.  It may have been that such caverns were formed in the usual geologic way—­bubbles or flaws in the earth’s crust—­which were later used by the monsters of the period of the young world.  It may have been, of course, that some of them were worn originally by water; but in time they all found a use when suitable for living monsters.

“This brings us to another point, more difficult to accept and understand than any other requiring belief in a base not usually accepted, or indeed entered on—­whether such abnormal growths could have ever changed in their nature.  Some day the study of metabolism may progress so far as to enable us to accept structural changes proceeding from an intellectual or moral base.  We may lean towards a belief that great animal strength may be a sound base for changes of all sorts.  If this be so, what could be a more fitting subject than primeval monsters whose strength was such as to allow a survival of thousands of years?  We do not know yet if brain can increase and develop independently of other parts of the living structure.

“After all, the mediaeval belief in the Philosopher’s Stone which could transmute metals, has its counterpart in the accepted theory of metabolism which changes living tissue.  In an age of investigation like our own, when we are returning to science as the base of wonders—­almost of miracles—­we should be slow to refuse to accept facts, however impossible they may seem to be.

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Project Gutenberg
Lair of the White Worm from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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