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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 165 pages of information about Lair of the White Worm.
sense of enjoyment about him, especially when he spoke of many great deaths.  Here, too, he sniffed in a strange way, like a bloodhound at check, and looked puzzled.  He said no word in either praise or disparagement, but in the centre of the Grove, where, hidden amongst ancient oak stumps, was a block of granite slightly hollowed on the top, he bent low and placed his forehead on the ground.  This was the only place where he showed distinct reverence.  At the Castle, though he spoke of much death, he showed no sign of respect.

There was evidently something about Diana’s Grove which both interested and baffled him.  Before leaving, he moved all over the place unsatisfied, and in one spot, close to the edge of the Brow, where there was a deep hollow, he appeared to be afraid.  After returning several times to this place, he suddenly turned and ran in a panic of fear to the higher ground, crossing as he did so the outcropping rock.  Then he seemed to breathe more freely, and recovered some of his jaunty impudence.

All this seemed to satisfy Adam’s expectations.  He went back to Lesser Hill with a serene and settled calm upon him.  Sir Nathaniel followed him into his study.

“By the way, I forgot to ask you details about one thing.  When that extraordinary staring episode of Mr. Caswall went on, how did Lilla take it—­how did she bear herself?”

“She looked frightened, and trembled just as I have seen a pigeon with a hawk, or a bird with a serpent.”

“Thanks.  It is just as I expected.  There have been circumstances in the Caswall family which lead one to believe that they have had from the earliest times some extraordinary mesmeric or hypnotic faculty.  Indeed, a skilled eye could read so much in their physiognomy.  That shot of yours, whether by instinct or intention, of the hawk and the pigeon was peculiarly apposite.  I think we may settle on that as a fixed trait to be accepted throughout our investigation.”

When dusk had fallen, Adam took the new mongoose—­not the one from Nepaul—­and, carrying the box slung over his shoulder, strolled towards Diana’s Grove.  Close to the gateway he met Lady Arabella, clad as usual in tightly fitting white, which showed off her slim figure.

To his intense astonishment the mongoose allowed her to pet him, take him up in her arms and fondle him.  As she was going in his direction, they walked on together.

Round the roadway between the entrances of Diana’s Grove and Lesser Hill were many trees, with not much foliage except at the top.  In the dusk this place was shadowy, and the view was hampered by the clustering trunks.  In the uncertain, tremulous light which fell through the tree-tops, it was hard to distinguish anything clearly, and at last, somehow, he lost sight of her altogether, and turned back on his track to find her.  Presently he came across her close to her own gate.  She was leaning over the paling of split oak branches which formed the paling of the avenue.  He could not see the mongoose, so he asked her where it had gone.

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