Lair of the White Worm eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 165 pages of information about Lair of the White Worm.

As the train drew up on the dockside, he was getting his hand traps together, when the carriage door was wrenched open and a young man jumped in.

“How are you, uncle?  I recognised you from the photo you sent me!  I wanted to meet you as soon as I could, but everything is so strange to me that I didn’t quite know what to do.  However, here I am.  I am glad to see you, sir.  I have been dreaming of this happiness for thousands of miles; now I find that the reality beats all the dreaming!” As he spoke the old man and the young one were heartily wringing each other’s hands.

The meeting so auspiciously begun proceeded well.  Adam, seeing that the old man was interested in the novelty of the ship, suggested that he should stay the night on board, and that he would himself be ready to start at any hour and go anywhere that the other suggested.  This affectionate willingness to fall in with his own plans quite won the old man’s heart.  He warmly accepted the invitation, and at once they became not only on terms of affectionate relationship, but almost like old friends.  The heart of the old man, which had been empty for so long, found a new delight.  The young man found, on landing in the old country, a welcome and a surrounding in full harmony with all his dreams throughout his wanderings and solitude, and the promise of a fresh and adventurous life.  It was not long before the old man accepted him to full relationship by calling him by his Christian name.  After a long talk on affairs of interest, they retired to the cabin, which the elder was to share.  Richard Salton put his hands affectionately on the boy’s shoulders—­though Adam was in his twenty-seventh year, he was a boy, and always would be, to his grand-uncle.

“I am so glad to find you as you are, my dear boy—­just such a young man as I had always hoped for as a son, in the days when I still had such hopes.  However, that is all past.  But thank God there is a new life to begin for both of us.  To you must be the larger part—­but there is still time for some of it to be shared in common.  I have waited till we should have seen each other to enter upon the subject; for I thought it better not to tie up your young life to my old one till we should have sufficient personal knowledge to justify such a venture.  Now I can, so far as I am concerned, enter into it freely, since from the moment my eyes rested on you I saw my son—­as he shall be, God willing—­if he chooses such a course himself.”

“Indeed I do, sir—­with all my heart!”

“Thank you, Adam, for that.”  The old, man’s eyes filled and his voice trembled.  Then, after a long silence between them, he went on:  “When I heard you were coming I made my will.  It was well that your interests should be protected from that moment on.  Here is the deed—­keep it, Adam.  All I have shall belong to you; and if love and good wishes, or the memory of them, can make life sweeter, yours shall be a happy one. 

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Lair of the White Worm from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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