Abraham Lincoln eBook

George Haven Putnam
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 191 pages of information about Abraham Lincoln.

In 1849, we find Lincoln’s name connected with an invention for lifting vessels over shoals.  His sojourn on the Sangamon River and his memory of the attempt, successful for the moment but ending in failure, to make the river available for steamboats, had attracted his attention to the problem of steering river vessels over shoals.

In 1864, when I was campaigning on the Red River in Louisiana, I noticed with interest a device that had been put into shape for the purpose of lifting river steamers over shoals.  This device took the form of stilts which for the smaller vessels (and only the smaller steamers could as a rule be managed in this way) were fastened on pivots from the upper deck on the outside of the hull and were worked from the deck with a force of two or three men at each stilt.  The difficulty on the Red River was that the Rebel sharp-shooters from the banks made the management of the stilts irregular.

In 1854, Douglas carried through Congress the Kansas-Nebraska Bill.  This bill repealed the Missouri Compromise of 1820, and cancelled also the provisions of the series of compromises of 1850.  Its purpose was to throw open for settlement and for later organisation as Slave States the whole territory of the North-west from which, under the Missouri Compromise, slavery had been excluded.  The Kansas-Nebraska Bill not only threw open a great territory to slavery but re-opened the whole slavery discussion.  The issues that were brought to the front in the discussions about this bill, and in the still more bitter contests after the passage of the bill in regard to the admission of Kansas as a Slave State, were the immediate precursors of the Civil War.  The larger causes lay further back, but the War would have been postponed for an indefinite period if it had not been for the pressing on the part of the South for the right to make Slave States throughout the entire territory of the country, and for the readiness on the part of certain Democratic leaders of the North, of whom Douglas was the chief, to accept this contention, and through such expedients to gain, or to retain, political control for the Democratic party.

In one of the long series of debates in Congress on the question of the right to take slaves into free territory, a planter from South Carolina drew an affecting picture of his relations with his old coloured foster-mother, the “mammy” of the plantation.  “Do you tell me,” he said, addressing himself to a Free-soil opponent, “that I, a free American citizen, am not to be permitted, if I want to go across the Missouri River, to take with me my whole home circle?  Do you say that I must leave my old ‘Mammy’ behind in South Carolina?” “Oh!” replied the Westerner, “the trouble with you is not that you cannot take your ‘Mammy’ into this free territory, but that you are not to be at liberty to sell her when you get her there.”

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Abraham Lincoln from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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