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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 172 pages of information about A Ramble of Six Thousand Miles through the United States of America.
684,822
Ohio —­ 45,365 230,760 581,434 937,679
Indiana —­ 4,875 24,520 147,178 341,582
Mississippi —­ 8,850 40,352 75,448 136,806
Illinois —­ —­ 12,233 55,211 157,575
Louisiana —­ —­ 76,556 153,407 215,791
Missouri —­ —­ 20,845 66,586 140,084
Alabama —­ —­ —­ 127,902 309,206
Michigan —­ —­ 4,762 8,896 31,123
Arkansas —­ —­ —­ 14,273 30,383
Florida —­ —­ —­ —­ 34,725
                3,929,827 5,305,925 7,289,314 9,638,131 12,856,437

INCREASE FROM 1820 TO 1830.

Per Cent.                        Per Cent. 
Maine                 33,398         S. Carolina      15,657
N. Hampshire          10,391         Georgia          51,472
Massachusetts         16,575         Kentucky         22,066
Rhode Island          17,157         Tennessee        62,044
Connecticut            8,151         Ohio             61,998
Vermont               19,005         Indiana         132,087
New York              39,386         Mississippi      81,032
New Jersey            15,564         Illinois        185,406
Pennsylvania          25,416         Louisiana        40,665
Delaware               5,487         Missouri        110,380
Maryland               9,712         Alabama         141,574
D. Columbia           20,639         Michigan        250,001
Virginia              13,069         Arkansas        113,273
N. Carolina           15,592         Florida              —­
Average                       32,392

EXTRACTS

FROM

“THE CHEROKEE PHOENIX,”

OF JULY 31, 1830.

The following is part of a Letter written by a Creek Chief, from the Arkansas territory.

“The son of General M’Intosh, (an Indian chief), with the M’Intosh party, held a treaty with the government, and were induced, by promises, to remove to Arkansas.  They were promised ‘a home for ever,’ if they would select one, and that bounds should be marked off to them.  This has not been done.  They were assured that they should draw a proportionate part of the annuity due to the Creek nation every year.  They have planted corn three seasons—­yet they have never drawn one cent of any annuity due to them!  Why is this?  They were promised blankets, guns, ammunition, traps, kettles, and a wheelwright.  They have drawn some few of each class of articles, and only a few—­they have no wheelwright.  They were poor;—­but above this, they were promised pay for the improvements abandoned by them in the old nation.  This they have not received.  They were further assured that they should receive,

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