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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 187 pages of information about The Camp Fire Girls at School.
to lead them to victory when the time for battle came.  Many of the foreigners believed to their dying day that they had seen a vision from heaven.  Sahwah at last got her bearings and found that she was not a great distance from the school, so she took her way thither where she might encounter some one who was connected with the play and knew of the existence of the statue, a secret which was being closely guarded from the public, that the effect might be greater.

She nearly wept with joy when she saw Dick Albright just about to enter the building.  Although he was startled almost out of a year’s growth at the sight of the statue, which he supposed to be standing on the stage in the building, running up the front steps after him, he did not disappear into space as had all of the others she had met.  After the first fright he suspected some practical joke and stood still to see what would happen next.  Sahwah knew that the only thing visible of her was her feet and that she could not explain matters with her voice, so, coming close to Dick, she stretched out her foot as far as possible.  Now Sahwah, with her riotous love of color, had bright red buttons on her black shoes, the only set like them in the school.  Dick recognized the buttons and knew that it was Sahwah in the statue.  He still thought she was playing a joke, and laughed uproariously.  Sahwah grew desperate.  She must make him understand that she wanted him to pull her out.  The broad stone terrace before the door was covered with a light fall of snow.  With the point of her toe she traced in the snow the words

“PULL ME OUT.”

Dick now took in the situation.  He opened the door of the statue and with some difficulty succeeded in extricating Sahwah from her precarious position.  Together they carried the much-traveled Maid into the building and up the stairs and set her in place on the stage.  She had just been missed by the arriving players and the place was in an uproar.  Sahwah told what had happened that afternoon and the adventures she had had in getting back to the school, while her listeners exclaimed incredulously.  There was no longer time to go home for supper so Sahwah ran off to the green room to begin making up for her part in the play.

CHAPTER X.

WHO CUT THE WIRE?

The house was packed on this the first night of the Thessalonian play.  It was already long past time for the performance to begin.  The orchestra finished the overture and waited a few minutes; then began another selection.  They played this through, and there was still no indication of the curtain going up.  They played a third piece.  The house became restless and began to clap for the appearance of the performers.  No sign from the stage.  Behind the curtain there was pandemonium.  When everything was about ready to begin it was discovered that none of the stage lights would work.  Neither

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