Slave Narratives: a Folk History of Slavery in the United States eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 284 pages of information about Slave Narratives.
Table of Contents
Section Page

Start of eBook1
1
SLAVE NARRATIVES1
WASHINGTON 19411
ARKANSAS NARRATIVES1
PART 61
INFORMANTS1
Foods4
Superstitious Beliefs Among Negroes6
Great-Grandmother on Mother’s Side13
Grandmother on Mother’s Side13
Mother13
Father13
Grandfather on Mother’s Side13
Grandmother on Father’s Side14
Other Ancestors14
Wife14
Whippings14
Patrollers14
How Freedom Came15
Slave Time Amusements15
Houses15
Right After Freedom16
Ku Klux Klan16
Political Trouble about 188816
Opinions17
Old People in Pulaski County17
Interviewer’s Comment17
Freedom24
Interviewer’s Comment24
How the Children Were Fed28
Sold28
Visited by Father28
Mother28
House29
Schooling29
Ku Klux29
Occupational Experiences29
Support Now30
Ate in the Big House40
Marriage40
Freedom40
Slave Wages and Experiences after the War40
Family40
Opinions40
Vocational Experiences41
Interviewer’s Comment41
Interviewer’s Comment46
Personal History of Informant55
Text of Interview (Unedited)55
Interviewer’s Comment56
Text of Interview65
Interviewer’s Comment66
Personal History of Informant66
Personal History of Informant69
Text of Interview (Unedited)69
Interviewer’s Comment79
Personal History of Informant81
Text of Interview (Unedited)81
Relatives85
Fort Sumter85
Patrollers and Good Masters86
First Pair of Shoes86
Bible and Church in Slave Time86
Education87
Murders87
Interviewer’s Comment89
Experience of Father91
Slave Houses92
Food92
Work92
Cruelties92
How Freedom Came92
Right After the War92
Ku Klux and Patrollers92
Occupational Experiences93
Marriage93
Present Condition93
Interviewer’s Comment93
Interviewer’s comment100
Houses110
Good Master110
Mean Masters111
Bushwhacking the Ku Klux111
Amusements112
Slaves who Bought Themselves112
Church112
How Freedom Came112
Soldiers112
Marriage112
Opinions112
Vocational Experiences113
113
Living Brother114
Soldiers114
Sold His Master114
Good Masters115
Ku Klux Klan115
Runaway Negroes—­After Freedom115
Right After the War116
Moving to Arkansas116
Vocational Experiences117
Opinions117
Good Masters127
Marriage127
Right After the War127
Vocational Experiences127
Former Morals128
Bachelor129
Successful Negroes in Little Rock129
Opinions129
Interviewer’s Comment130
Father133
Yankees133
Visiting the Graves134
The Slave Block134
Arkansas134
Plantation135
Destructiveness of Soldiers135
Rations135
How the Day Went135
The Old Lady at the Big House136
Relatives136
Patrollers136
What the Slaves Expected and Got136
Voting137
Family137
Ku Klux Klan137
Occupation137
Interviewer’s Comments139
Interviewer’s Comment141
Interviewer’s Comment143
Birth and Relatives143
Good Masters144
Jayhawkers144
Soldiers145
Slave Houses145
Amusements145
Church145
Personal Occupations146
Right after the War146
Present Support146
Early Days150
Marriage151
How the Day Went151
Patrollers151
Jayhawkers151
Runaways152
Slave Breeding152
Amusements152
How Freedom Came152
Slave Earnings153
What Slaves Got When Freed153
Come Again153
Interviewer’s Comment153
OLD SLAVE STORIES153
I154
Master157
Whippings157
Runaways157
Natchez157
Age and Other Masters158
Slave Work158
Patrollers, Jayhawkers, Ku Klux, and Ku Klux Klan159
Slave Houses, Furniture, Food, and Work159
Slave Marriages159
A Lincoln Story159
What the Slaves Got160
Schooling160
Marriages160
Present Condition160
Opinions161
Voting and Vocational Experiences161
Interviewer’s Comment161
Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
Slave Narratives: a Folk History of Slavery in the United States from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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