Abraham Lincoln, a History — Volume 02 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 377 pages of information about Abraham Lincoln, a History Volume 02.

    Q. 2.  ’I desire him to answer whether he stands pledged to-day,
    as he did in 1854, against the admission of any more slave-States
    into the Union even if the people want them?’

    A.  I do not now, nor ever did, stand pledged against the
    admission of any more slave-States into the Union.

    Q. 3.  ’I want to know whether he stands pledged against the
    admission of a new State into the Union with such a constitution
    as the people of that State may see fit to make?’

    A.  I do not stand pledged against the admission of a new State
    into the Union with such a constitution as the people of that
    State may see fit to make.

    Q. 4.  ’I want to know whether he stands to-day pledged to the
    abolition of slavery in the District of Columbia?’

    A.  I do not stand to-day pledged to the abolition of slavery in
    the District of Columbia.

    Q. 5.  ’I desire him to answer whether he stands pledged to the
    prohibition of the slave trade between the different States?’

    A.  I do not stand pledged to the prohibition of the slave trade
    between the different States.

    Q. 6.  ’I desire to know whether he stands pledged to prohibit
    slavery in all the Territories of the United States, north as well
    as south of the Missouri Compromise line?’

    A.  I am impliedly if not expressly pledged to a belief in the
    right and duty of Congress to prohibit slavery in all the United
    States Territories.

    Q. 7.  ’I desire him to answer whether he is opposed to the
    acquisition of any new territory unless slavery is first
    prohibited therein?’

A.  I am not generally opposed to honest acquisition of territory; and, in any given case, I would or would not oppose such acquisition accordingly as I might think such acquisition would or would not aggravate the slavery question among ourselves.”—­Lincoln-Douglas Debates, p. 88.

[3] LINCOLN’S QUESTIONS.

Question 1.  If the people of Kansas shall, by means entirely unobjectionable in all other respects, adopt a State constitution, and ask admission into the Union under it, before they have the requisite number of inhabitants according to the English bill,—­some 93,000,—­will you vote to admit them?
Q. 2.  Can the people of a United States Territory, in any lawful way, against the wish of any citizen of the United States, exclude slavery from its limits, prior to the formation of a State constitution?
Q. 3.  If the Supreme Court of the United States shall decide that States cannot exclude slavery from their limits, are you in favor of acquiescing in, adopting, and following such decision as a rule of political action?

    Q. 4.  Are you in favor of acquiring additional territory, in
    disregard of how such acquisition may affect the nation on the
    slavery question?”—­Lincoln-Douglas Debates, p. 90.

Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
Abraham Lincoln, a History — Volume 02 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
Follow Us on Facebook