Anabasis eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 284 pages of information about Anabasis.
they wait here for our benefit, and to agree upon a fare, on the principle of repaying kindnesses in kind.”  That too was passed.  “Well then,” said he, “in case, after all, our endeavours should not be crowned with success, and we find that we have not vessels enough, I propose that we should enjoin on the cities along the seaboard the duty of constructing and putting in order the roads, which we hear are impassable.  They will be only too glad to obey, no doubt, out of mere terror and their desire to be rid of us.”

This last proposal was met by loud cries and protestations against the idea of going by land at all.  So, perceiving their infatuation, he did not put the question to the vote, but eventually persuaded the cities voluntarily to construct roads by the suggestion, “If you get your roads in good order, we shall all the sooner be gone.”  They further got a fifty-oared galley from the Trapezuntines, and gave the command of it to Dexippus, a Laconian, one of the perioeci[1].  This man altogether neglected to collect vessels on the offing, but slunk off himself, and vanished, ship and all, out of Pontus.  Later on, however, he paid the penalty of his misdeeds.  He became involved in some meddling and making in Thrace at the court of Seuthes, and was put to death by the Laconian Nicander.  They also got a thirty-oared galley, the command of which was entrusted to Polycrates, an Athenian, and 16 that officer brought into harbour to the camp all the vessels he could lay his hands on.  If these were laden, they took out the freights and appointed guards to keep an eye on their preservation, whilst they used the ships themselves for transport service on the coast.  While matters stood at this point, the Hellenes used to make forays with varying success; sometimes they captured prey and sometimes they failed.  On one occasion Cleanetus led his own and another company against a strong position, and was killed himself, with many others of his party.

[1] A native of the country parts of Laconia.

II

The time came when it was no longer possible to capture provisions, 1 going and returning to the camp in one day.  In consequence of this, Xenophon took some guides from the Trapezuntines and led half the army out against the Drilae, leaving the other half to guard the camp.  That was necessary, since the Colchians, who had been ousted from their houses, were assembled thickly, and sat eyeing them from the heights above; on the other hand the Trapezuntines, being friendly to the native inhabitants, were not for leading the Hellenes to places where it was easy to capture provisions.  But against the Drilae, from whom they personally suffered, they would lead them with enthusiasm, up into mountainous and scarcely accessible fortresses, and against the most warlike people of any in the Pontus.

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Anabasis from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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