Anabasis eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 284 pages of information about Anabasis.

But as soon as the Hellenes again moved onwards, the hostile cavalry at once left the hillock—­not in a body any longer, but in fragments—­some streaming from one side, some from another; and the crest was gradually stripped of its occupants, till at last the company was gone.  Accordingly, Clearchus did not ascend the crest, but posting his army at its base, he sent Lycius of Syracuse and another to the summit, with orders to inspect the condition of things on the other side, and to report results.  Lycius galloped up and investigated, bringing back news that they were fleeing might and main.  Almost at that instant the sun sank beneath the horizon.  There the Hellenes halted; they grounded arms and rested, marvelling the while that Cyrus was not anywhere to be seen, and that no messenger had come from him.  For they were in complete ignorance of his death, and conjectured that either he had gone off in pursuit, or had pushed forward to occupy some point.  Left to themselves, they now deliberated, whether they should stay where they were and have the baggage train brought up, or should return to camp.  They resolved to return, and about supper time reached the tents.  Such was the conclusion of this day.

They found the larger portion of their property pillaged, eatables and drinkables alike, not excepting the wagons laden with corn and wine, which Cyrus had prepared in case of some extreme need overtaking the expedition, to divide among the Hellenes.  There were four hundred of these wagons, it was said, and these had now been ransacked by the king and his men; so that the greater number of the Hellenes went supperless, having already gone without their breakfasts, since the king had appeared before the usual halt for breakfast.  Accordingly, in no better plight than this they passed the night.

BOOK II

[In the previous book will be found a full account of the method by which Cyrus collected a body of Greeks when meditating an expedition against his brother Artaxerxes; as also of various occurrences on the march up; of the battle itself, and of the death of Cyrus; and lastly, a description of the arrival of the Hellenes in camp after the battle, and as to how they betook themselves to rest, none suspecting but what they were altogether victorious and that Cyrus lived.]

I

With the break of day the generals met, and were surprised that Cyrus 1 should not have appeared himself, or at any rate have sent some one to tell them what to do.  Accordingly, they resolved to put what they had together, to get under arms, and to push forward until they effected junction with Cyrus.  Just as they were on the point of starting, with the rising sun came Procles the ruler of Teuthrania.  He was a descendant of Damaratus[1] the Laconian, and with him also came Glus the son of Tamos.  These two told them, first, that Cyrus was dead; next, that Ariaeus had retreated with the rest of the barbarians to the halting-place whence they had started at dawn on the previous day; and wished to inform them that, if they were minded to come, he would wait for this one day, but on the morrow he should return home again to Ionia, whence he came.

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Anabasis from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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