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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 284 pages of information about Anabasis.
high self-esteem, I cannot escape the reflection that personally I may be taught wisdom by a painful process.  But with your own idea that under a single general there will be less factiousness than when there were many, be assured 29 that in choosing some other than me you will not find me factious.  I hold that whosoever sets up factious opposition to his leader factiously opposes his own safety.  While if you determine to choose me, I should not be surprised were that choice to entail upon you and me the resentment of other people.”

After those remarks on Xenophon’s part, many more got up, one after another, insisting on the propriety of his undertaking the command.  One of them, Agasias the Stymphalian, said:  It was really ridiculous, if things had come to this pass that the Lacedeamonians are to fly into a rage because a number of friends have met together to dinner, and omitted to choose a Lacedaemonian to sit at the head of the table.  “Really, if that is how matters stand,” said he, “I do not see what right we have to be officers even, we who are only Arcadians.”  That sally brought down the plaudits of the assembly; and Xenophon, seeing that something more was needed, stepped forward again and spoke, “Pardon, sirs,” he said, “let me make a clean breast of it.  I swear to you by all the gods and goddesses; verily and indeed, I no sooner perceived your purpose, than I consulted the victims, whether it was better for you to entrust this leadership to me, and for me to undertake it, or the reverse.  And the gods vouchsafed a sign to me so plain that even a common man might understand it, and perceive that from such sovereignty I must needs hold myself aloof.”

Under these circumstances they chose Cheirisophus, who, after his election, stepped forward and said:  “Nay, sirs, be well assured of this, that had you chosen some one else, I for my part should not have set up factious opposition.  As to Xenophon, I believe you have done him a good turn by not appointing him; for even now Dexippus has gone some way in traducing him to Anaxibius, as far as it lay in his power to do so, and that, in spite of my attempts to silence him.  What he said was that he believed Xenophon would rather share the command of Clearchus’s army with Timasion, a Dardanian, than with himself, a Laconian.  But,” continued Cheirisophus, “since your choice has fallen 33 upon me, I will make it my endeavour to do you all the good in my power; so make your preparations to weigh anchor to-morrow; wind and weather permitting, we will voyage to Heraclea; every one must endeavour, therefore, to put in at that port; and for the rest we will consult, when we are come thither.”

II

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