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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 284 pages of information about Anabasis.

[3] I.e. “chestnuts.”

The Hellenes breakfasted and then started forward on their march, having first delivered the stronghold to their allies among the Mossynoecians.  As for the other strongholds belonging to tribes allied with their foes, which they passed en route, the most accessible were either deserted by their inhabitants or gave in their adhesion 30 voluntarily.  The following description will apply to the majority of them:  the cities were on an average ten miles apart, some more, some less; but so elevated is the country and intersected by such deep clefts that if they chose to shout across to one another, their cries would be heard from one city to another.  When, in the course of their march, they came upon a friendly population, these would entertain them with exhibitions of fatted children belonging to the wealthy classes, fed up on boiled chestnuts until they were as white as white can be, of skin plump and delicate, and very nearly as broad as they were long, with their backs variegated and their breasts tattooed with patterns of all sorts of flowers.  They sought after the women in the Hellenic army, and would fain have laid with them openly in broad daylight, for that was their custom.  The whole community, male and female alike, were fair-complexioned and white-skinned.

It was agreed that this was the most barbaric and outlandish people that they had passed through on the whole expedition, and the furthest removed from the Hellenic customs, doing in a crowd precisely what other people would prefer to do in solitude, and when alone behaving exactly as others would behave in company, talking to themselves and laughing at their own expense, standing still and then again capering about, wherever they might chance to be, without rhyme or reason, as if their sole business were to show off to the rest of the world.

V

Through this country, friendly or hostile as the chance might be, the 1 Hellenes marched, eight stages in all, and reached the Chalybes.  These were a people few in number, and subject to the Mossynoecians.  Their livelihood was for the most part derived from mining and forging iron.

Thence they came to the Tibarenians.  The country of the Tibarenians was far more level, and their fortresses lay on the seaboard and were less strong, whether by art or nature.  The generals wanted to attack these places, so that the army might get some pickings, and they would not accept the gifts of hospitality which came in from the 2 Tibarenians, but bidding them wait till they had taken counsel, they proceeded to offer sacrifice.  After several abortive attempts, the seers at last pronounced an opinion that the gods in no wise countenanced war.  Then they accepted the gifts of hospitality, and marching through what was now recognised as a friendly country, in two days reached Cotyora, a Hellenic city, and a colony of Sinope, albeit situated in the territory of the Tibarenians[1].

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