The German Classics of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, Volume 03 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 414 pages of information about The German Classics of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, Volume 03.

[Footnote 52:  It was the custom at the meetings of the Landes Gemeinde, or Diet, to set swords upright in the ground as emblems of authority.]

[Footnote 53:  The Heribann was a muster of warriors similar to the arriere ban of France.]

[Footnote 54:  A The Duke of Suabia, who soon afterward assassinated his uncle for withholding his patrimony from him.]

[Footnote 55:  A sort of national militia.]

[Footnote 56:  Rocks on shore of Lake Lucerne.]

[Footnote 57:  An allusion to the gallant self-devotion of Arnold Struthan of Winkelried, at the battle of Sempach [9th July, 1386], who broke the Austrian phalanx by rushing on their lances, grasping as many of them as he could reach, and concentrating them upon his breast.  The confederates rushed forward through the gap thus opened by the sacrifice of their comrade, broke and cut down their enemy’s ranks, and soon became the masters of the field.  “Dear and faithful confederates, I will open you a passage.  Protect my wife and children,” were the words of Winkelried, as he rushed to death.]

[Footnote 58:  The URPHEDE was an oath of peculiar force.  When a man, who was at feud with another, invaded his lands and was worsted, he often made terms with his enemy by swearing the Urphede, by which he bound himself to depart, and never to return with a hostile intention.]

* * * * *

THE HOMAGE OF THE ARTS

A MASQUE

Dedicated in all reverence to her Imperial Highness, the Crown Princess of Weimar, MARIA PAULOWNA, Grand-Duchess of Russia, and produced at the Court Theatre in Weimar, November 12, 1804.

DRAMATIS PERSONAE.

A FATHER. 
A MOTHER. 
A YOUTH. 
A MAIDEN. 
CHORUS OF COUNTRY PEOPLE. 
GENIUS. 
THE SEVEN ARTS.

The scene is laid in a country place.  In the centre of the stage, an orange-tree, laden with fruit and bedecked with ribbons.  The country people are setting it firmly in the earth, while maidens and children, on each side, hold it erect by means of garlands of flowers.

THE HOMAGE OF THE ARTS (1804)

TRANSLATED BY A. I. DU P. COLEMAN, A.M.

Professor of English Literature, College of the City of New York

  THE FATHER

  Blossom, blossom, bountiful tree
  With thy golden apples gay,
  Which from lands so far away
  We have brought for ours to see! 
  Fullest fruitage ever bearing,
  May thy branches ne’er decay!

  ALL

  Blossom, blossom, bountiful tree,
  Shooting upward strong and free!

  THE YOUTH

  With the fragrant bloom united,
    Proudly hang the golden store! 
  May it stand by storms unblighted,
    May it grow from more to more!

  ALL

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The German Classics of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, Volume 03 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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