The German Classics of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, Volume 03 eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 414 pages of information about The German Classics of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, Volume 03.

ILLUSTRATIONS—­VOLUME III

  Milton and His Daughters.  By Michael von Munkacsy

  Schiller.  By C. Jaeger

  Schiller’s Father and Mother

  Schiller’s House in Weimar and Birthplace in Marbach

  Monument to Schiller in Berlin.  By Reinhold Begas

  Military Academy in Stuttgart and the Theatre in Mannheim, 1782

  Church in which Schiller was married

  Schiller at the Court of Weimar

  The Knight scorns Cunigonde.  By Eugen Klimsch

  The Diver.  By Carl Gehrts

  The Lay of the Bell.  By Julius Benezur

  Cassandra.  By Ferdinand Keller

  The Count gives up his Horse to the Priest.  By Alexander Wagner

  Wallenstein and Seni

  Wallenstein and Terzky

  Wallenstein hears of Octavio’s Treason

  Wallenstein warned by his Friends

  The Death of Wallenstein.  By Karl von Piloty

  Stauffacher and his Wife Gertrude

  The Oath on the Ruetli

  Tell takes Leave of his Family

  Tell and Gessler

  The Death of Attinghausen.  By Wilhelm von Kaulbach

  The Homage of the Arts.  By Hermann Wislicenus

  Gustavus Adolphus

  Wallenstein.  By Van Dyck

  Monument to Goethe and Schiller in Weimar.  By Ernst Rietschel

  Goethe on Schiller.  From the Ford Collection, New York Public Library

  Schiller on Goethe.  From the Ford Collection, New York Public Library

  Schiller Reciting from his Works to his Weimar Friends.  By Theobald
  von Oer

  The Goethe and Schiller Archives in Weimar

  Facsimile of Leaf from the Album of Schiller’s Letters to Charlotte
   von Lengefeld

THE LIFE OF SCHILLER

BY CALVIN THOMAS, LL.D.

Professor of Germanic Languages and Literatures, Columbia University

  He kept the faith.  The ardent poet-soul,
  Once thrilled to madness by the fiery gleam
  Of Freedom glimpsed afar in youthful dream,
  Henceforth was true as needle to the pole. 
  The vision he had caught remained the goal
  Of manhood’s aspiration and the theme
  Of those high luminous musings that redeem
  Our souls from bondage to the general dole
  Of trivial existence.  Calm and free
  He faced the Sphinx, nor ever knew dismay,
  Nor bowed to externalities the knee,
  Nor took a guerdon from the fleeting day;
  But dwelt on earth in that eternity
  Where Truth and Beauty shine with blended ray.[2]

Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
The German Classics of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, Volume 03 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
Follow Us on Facebook