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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 41 pages of information about Madam Crowl's Ghost and the Dead Sexton.

“My heart was in my mouth when I sid the journey was over, and this the great house afoore me, and I sa near my aunt that I never sid till noo, and Dame Crowl, that I was come to wait upon, and was afeard on already.

“My aunt kissed me in the hall, and brought me to her room.  She was tall and thin, wi’ a pale face and black eyes, and long thin hands wi’ black mittins on.  She was past fifty, and her word was short; but her word was law.  I hev no complaints to make of her; but she was a hard woman, and I think she would hev bin kinder to me if I had bin her sister’s child in place of her brother’s.  But all that’s o’ no consequence noo.

“The squire—­his name was Mr. Chevenix Crowl, he was Dame Crowl’s grandson—­came down there, by way of seeing that the old lady was well treated, about twice or thrice in the year.  I sid him but twice all the time I was at Applewale House.

“I can’t say but she was well taken care of, notwithstanding; but that was because my aunt and Meg Wyvern, that was her maid, had a conscience, and did their duty by her.

“Mrs. Wyvern—­Meg Wyvern my aunt called her to herself, and Mrs. Wyvern to me—­was a fat, jolly lass of fifty, a good height and a good breadth, always good-humoured and walked slow.  She had fine wages, but she was a bit stingy, and kept all her fine clothes under lock and key, and wore, mostly, a twilled chocolate cotton, wi’ red, and yellow, and green sprigs and balls on it, and it lasted wonderful.

“She never gave me nout, not the vally o’ a brass thimble, all the time I was there; but she was good-humoured, and always laughin’, and she talked no end o’ proas over her tea; and, seeing me sa sackless and dowly, she roused me up wi’ her laughin’ and stories; and I think I liked her better than my aunt—­children is so taken wi’ a bit o’ fun or a story—­though my aunt was very good to me, but a hard woman about some things, and silent always.

“My aunt took me into her bed-chamber, that I might rest myself a bit while she was settin’ the tea in her room.  But first, she patted me on the shouther, and said I was a tall lass o’ my years, and had spired up well, and asked me if I could do plain work and stitchin’; and she looked in my face, and said I was like my father, her brother, that was dead and gone, and she hoped I was a better Christian, and wad na du a’ that lids (would not do anything of that sort).

“It was a hard sayin’ the first time I set foot in her room, I thought.

“When I went into the next room, the housekeeper’s room—­very comfortable, yak (oak) all round—­there was a fine fire blazin’ away, wi’ coal, and peat, and wood, all in a low together, and tea on the table, and hot cake, and smokin’ meat; and there was Mrs. Wyvern, fat, jolly, and talkin’ away, more in an hour than my aunt would in a year.

“While I was still at my tea my aunt went up-stairs to see Madam Crowl.

“‘She’s agone up to see that old Judith Squailes is awake,’ says Mrs. Wyvern.  ’Judith sits with Madam Crowl when me and Mrs. Shutters’—­that was my aunt’s name—­’is away.  She’s a troublesome old lady.  Ye’ll hev to be sharp wi’ her, or she’ll be into the fire, or out o’ t’ winda.  She goes on wires, she does, old though she be.’

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