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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 129 pages of information about Old Greek Stories.

Perseus soon crossed the ocean and came again to the Land of the West.  Far below him he could see the three Maidens dancing around the golden tree; but he did not stop, for, now that he had the head of Medusa safe in the pouch at his side, he must hasten home.  Straight east he flew over the great sea, and after a time he came to a country where there were palm trees and pyramids and a great river flowing from the south.  Here, as he looked down, a strange sight met his eyes:  he saw a beautiful girl chained to a rock by the seashore, and far away a huge sea beast swimming towards her to devour her.  Quick as thought, he flew down and spoke to her; but, as she could not see him for the Cap of Darkness which he wore, his voice only frightened her.

Then Perseus took off his cap, and stood upon the rock; and when the girl saw him with his long hair and wonderful eyes and laughing face, she thought him the handsomest young man in the world.

“Oh, save me! save me!” she cried as she reached out her arms towards him.

Perseus drew his sharp sword and cut the chain which held her, and then lifted her high up upon the rock.  But by this time the sea monster was close at hand, lashing the water with his tail and opening his wide jaws as though he would swallow not only Perseus and the young girl, but even the rock on which they were standing.  He was a terrible fellow, and yet not half so terrible as the Gorgon.  As he came roaring towards the shore, Perseus lifted the head of Medusa from his pouch and held it up; and when the beast saw the dreadful face he stopped short and was turned into stone; and men say that the stone beast may be seen in that selfsame spot to this day.

Then Perseus slipped the Gorgon’s head back into the pouch and hastened to speak with the young girl whom he had saved.  She told him that her name was Andromeda, and that she was the daughter of the king of that land.  She said that her mother, the queen, was very beautiful and very proud of her beauty; and every day she went down to the seashore to look at her face as it was pictured in the quiet water; and she had boasted that not even the nymphs who live in the sea were as handsome as she.  When the sea nymphs heard about this, they were very angry and asked great Neptune, the king of the sea, to punish the queen for her pride.  So Neptune sent a sea monster to crush the king’s ships and kill the cattle along the shore and break down all the fishermen’s huts.  The people were so much distressed that they sent at last to ask the Pythia what they should do; and the Pythia said that there was only one way to save the land from destruction,—­that they must give the king’s daughter, Andromeda, to the monster to be devoured.

The king and the queen loved their daughter very dearly, for she was their only child; and for a long time they refused to do as the Pythia had told them.  But day after day the monster laid waste the land, and threatened to destroy not only the farms, but the towns; and so they were forced in the end to give up Andromeda to save their country.  This, then, was why she had been chained to the rock by the shore and left there to perish in the jaws of the beast.

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