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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 129 pages of information about Old Greek Stories.

[Illustration:]

THE QUEST OF MEDUSA’S HEAD.

I. The wooden chest.

There was a king of Argos who had but one child, and that child was a girl.  If he had had a son, he would have trained him up to be a brave man and great king; but he did not know what to do with this fair-haired daughter.  When he saw her growing up to be tall and slender and wise, he wondered if, after all, he would have to die some time and leave his lands and his gold and his kingdom to her.  So he sent to Delphi and asked the Pythia about it.  The Pythia told him that he would not only have to die some time, but that the son of his daughter would cause his death.

This frightened the king very much, and he tried to think of some plan by which he could keep the Pythia’s words from coming true.  At last he made up his mind that he would build a prison for his daughter and keep her in it all her life.  So he called his workmen and had them dig a deep round hole in the ground, and in this hole they built a house of brass which had but one room and no door at all, but only a small window at the top.  When it was finished, the king put the maiden, whose name was Danae, into it; and with her he put her nurse and her toys and her pretty dresses and everything that he thought she would need to make her happy.

“Now we shall see that the Pythia does not always tell the truth,” he said.

So Danae was kept shut up in the prison of brass.  She had no one to talk to but her old nurse; and she never saw the land or the sea, but only the blue sky above the open window and now and then a white cloud sailing across.  Day after day she sat under the window and wondered why her father kept her in that lonely place, and whether he would ever come and take her out.  I do not know how many years passed by, but Danae grew fairer every day, and by and by she was no longer a child, but a tall and beautiful woman; and Jupiter amid the clouds looked down and saw her and loved her.

One day it seemed to her that the sky opened and a shower of gold fell through the window into the room; and when the blinding shower had ceased, a noble young man stood smiling before her.  She did not know—­nor do I—­that it was mighty Jupiter who had thus come down in the rain; but she thought that he was a brave prince who had come from over the sea to take her out of her prison-house.

After that he came often, but always as a tall and handsome youth; and by and by they were married, with only the nurse at the wedding feast, and Danae was so happy that she was no longer lonesome even when he was away.  But one day when he climbed out through the narrow window there was a great flash of light, and she never saw him again.

Not long afterwards a babe was born to Danae, a smiling boy whom she named Perseus.  For four years she and the nurse kept him hidden, and not even the women who brought their food to the window knew about him.  But one day the king chanced to be passing by and heard the child’s prattle.  When he learned the truth, he was very much alarmed, for he thought that now, in spite of all that he had done, the words of the Pythia might come true.

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