Old Greek Stories eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 129 pages of information about Old Greek Stories.

“I will let him know,” said Admetus.

Early the next morning he built an altar of stones in the open field; and when he had killed the fattest goat of the flock, he built a fire on the altar and laid the thighs of the goat in the flames.  Then when the smell of the burning flesh went up into the air, he lifted his hands towards the mountain tops and called to Apollo.

“Lord of the Silver Bow,” he cried, “if ever I have shown kindness to the poor and the distressed, come now and help me.  For I am in sore need, and I remember your promise.”

Hardly was he done speaking when bright Apollo, bearing his bow and his quiver of arrows, came down and stood before him.

“Kindest of kings,” he said, “tell me how I can help you.”

Then Admetus told him all about the fair Alcestis, and how her father would give her only to the man who should come for her in a chariot drawn by a lion and a wild boar.

“Come with me,” said Apollo, “and I will help you.”

Then the two went together into the forest, the Lord of the Silver Bow leading the way.  Soon they started a lion from its lair and gave chase to it.  The fleet-footed Apollo seized the beast by its mane, and although it howled and snapped with its fierce jaws it did not touch him.  Then Admetus started a wild boar from a thicket.  Apollo gave chase to it, too, making the lion run beside him like a dog.  When he had caught the boar, he went on through the forest, leading the two beasts, one with his right hand, the other with his left; and Admetus followed behind.

[Illustration:  “It was A strange team.”]

It was not yet noon when they came to the edge of the woods and saw the sea and the city of Iolcus only a little way off.  A golden chariot stood by the roadside as if waiting for them, and the lion and the boar were soon harnessed to it.  It was a strange team, and the two beasts tried hard to fight each other; but Apollo lashed them with a whip and tamed them until they lost their fierceness and were ready to mind the rein.  Then Admetus climbed into the chariot; and Apollo stood by his side and held the reins and the whip, and drove into Iolcus.

Old King Pelias was astonished when he saw the wonderful chariot and the glorious charioteer; and when Admetus again asked him for the fair Alcestis, he could not refuse.  A day was set for the wedding, and Apollo drove his team back to the forest and set the lion and the wild boar free.

And so Admetus and Alcestis were married, and everybody in the two towns, except gruff old King Pelias, was glad.  Apollo himself was one of the guests at the wedding feast, and he brought a present for the young bridegroom; it was a promise from the Mighty Folk upon the mountain top that if Admetus should ever be sick and in danger of death, he might become well again if some one who loved him would die for him.

III.  THE SHADOW LEADER.

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Old Greek Stories from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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