Old Greek Stories eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 129 pages of information about Old Greek Stories.

The two children grew very fast.  Apollo became tall and strong and graceful; his face was as bright as the sunbeams; and he carried joy and gladness with him wherever he went.  Jupiter gave him a pair of swans and a golden chariot, which bore him over sea and land wherever he wanted to go; and he gave him a lyre on which he played the sweetest music that was ever heard, and a silver bow with sharp arrows which never missed the mark.  When Apollo went out into the world, and men came to know about him, he was called by some the Bringer of Light, by others the Master of Song, and by still others the Lord of the Silver Bow.

Diana was tall and graceful, too, and very handsome.  She liked to wander in the woods with her maids, who were called nymphs; she took kind care of the timid deer and the helpless creatures which live among the trees; and she delighted in hunting wolves and bears and other savage beasts.  She was loved and feared in every land, and Jupiter made her the queen of the green woods and the chase.

II.  DELPHI.

“Where is the center of the world?”

This is the question which some one asked Jupiter as he sat in his golden hall.  Of course the mighty ruler of earth and sky was too wise to be puzzled by so simple a thing, but he was too busy to answer it at once.  So he said: 

“Come again in one year from to-day, and I will show you the very place.”

Then Jupiter took two swift eagles which could fly faster than the storm-wind, and trained them till the speed of the one was the same as that of the other.  At the end of the year he said to his servants: 

“Take this eagle to the eastern rim of the earth, where the sun rises out of the sea; and carry his fellow to the far west, where the ocean is lost in darkness and nothing lies beyond.  Then, when I give you the sign, loosen both at the same moment.”

The servants did as they were bidden, and carried the eagles to the outermost edges of the world.  Then Jupiter clapped his hands.  The lightning flashed, the thunder rolled, and the two swift birds were set free.  One of them flew straight back towards the west, the other flew straight back towards the east; and no arrow ever sped faster from the bow than did these two birds from the hands of those who had held them.

On and on they went like shooting stars rushing to meet each other; and Jupiter and all his mighty company sat amid the clouds and watched their flight.  Nearer and nearer they came, but they swerved not to the right nor to the left.  Nearer and nearer—­and then with a crash like the meeting of two ships at sea, the eagles came together in mid-air and fell dead to the ground.

“Who asked where is the center of the world?” said Jupiter.  “The spot where the two eagles lie—­that is the center of the world.”

They had fallen on the top of a mountain in Greece which men have ever since called Parnassus.

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Old Greek Stories from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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