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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 324 pages of information about The Works of Charles and Mary Lamb Volume 4.

(While Mr. H. has been speaking, two Gentlemen have been observing him curiously.)

FIRST GENTLEMAN
Who the devil is this extraordinary personage?

SECOND GENTLEMAN
Who? why ’tis Mr. H.

FIRST GENTLEMAN
Has he no more name?

SECOND GENTLEMAN None that has yet transpired.  No more! why that single letter has been enough to inflame the imaginations of all the ladies in Bath.  He has been here but a fortnight, and is already received into all the first families.

FIRST GENTLEMAN
Wonderful! yet nobody knows who he is, or where he comes from!

SECOND GENTLEMAN He is vastly rich, gives away money as if he had infinity; dresses well, as you see; and for address, the mothers are all dying for fear the daughters should get him; and for the daughters, he may command them as absolutely as—.  Melesinda, the rich heiress, ’tis thought, will carry him.

FIRST GENTLEMAN
And is it possible that a mere anonymous—­

SECOND GENTLEMAN Phoo! that is the charm, Who is he? and What is he? and What is his name?—­The man with the great nose on his face never excited more of the gaping passion of wonderment in the dames of Strasburg, than this new-comer with the single letter to his name, has lighted up among the wives and maids of Bath; his simply having lodgings here, draws more visitors to the house than an election.  Come with me to the parade, and I will shew you more of him. [Exeunt.]

SCENE.—­In the Street.

(MR. H. walking, BELVIL meeting him.)

BELVIL
My old Jamaica school-fellow, that I have not seen for so many years? it
must, it can be no other than Jack (going up to him).  My dear Ho——­

MR. H. (Stopping his mouth.)
Ho——! the devil, hush.

BELVIL
Why sure it is—­

MR. H.
It is, it is your old friend Jack, that shall be nameless.

BELVIL
My dear Ho——­

MR. H. (Stopping him.)
Don’t name it.

BELVIL
Name what?

MR. H.
My curst, unfortunate name.  I have reasons to conceal it for a time.

BELVIL
I understand you—­Creditors, Jack?

MR. H.
No, I assure you.

BELVIL
Snapp’d up a ward, peradventure, and the whole Chancery at your heels?

MR. H.
I don’t use to travel with such cumbersome luggage.

BELVIL
You ha’n’t taken a purse?

MR. H.
To relieve you at once from all disgraceful conjectures, you must know,
’tis nothing but the sound of my name.

BELVIL
Ridiculous! ’tis true your’s is none of the most romantic, but what can
that signify in a man?

MR. H.
You must understand that I am in some credit with the ladies.

BELVIL
With the ladies!

MR. H.
And truly I think not without some pretensions.  My fortune—­

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