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Babbit eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 351 pages of information about Babbit.

When she had firmly returned him to his group, he remembered, by a connection quite untraceable, that his mother’s mother had been Scotch, and with head thrown back, eyes closed, wide mouth indicating ecstasy, he sang, very slowly and richly, “Loch Lomond.”

But that was the last of his mellowness and jolly companionship.  The man from Sparta said he was a “bum singer,” and for ten minutes Babbitt quarreled with him, in a loud, unsteady, heroic indignation.  They called for drinks till the manager insisted that the place was closed.  All the while Babbitt felt a hot raw desire for more brutal amusements.  When W. A. Rogers drawled, “What say we go down the line and look over the girls?” he agreed savagely.  Before they went, three of them secretly made appointments with the professional dancing girl, who agreed “Yes, yes, sure, darling” to everything they said, and amiably forgot them.

As they drove back through the outskirts of Monarch, down streets of small brown wooden cottages of workmen, characterless as cells, as they rattled across warehouse-districts which by drunken night seemed vast and perilous, as they were borne toward the red lights and violent automatic pianos and the stocky women who simpered, Babbitt was frightened.  He wanted to leap from the taxicab, but all his body was a murky fire, and he groaned, “Too late to quit now,” and knew that he did not want to quit.

There was, they felt, one very humorous incident on the way.  A broker from Minnemagantic said, “Monarch is a lot sportier than Zenith.  You Zenith tightwads haven’t got any joints like these here.”  Babbitt raged, “That’s a dirty lie!  Snothin’ you can’t find in Zenith.  Believe me, we got more houses and hootch-parlors an’ all kinds o’ dives than any burg in the state.”

He realized they were laughing at him; he desired to fight; and forgot it in such musty unsatisfying experiments as he had not known since college.

In the morning, when he returned to Zenith, his desire for rebellion was partly satisfied.  He had retrograded to a shamefaced contentment.  He was irritable.  He did not smile when W. A. Rogers complained, “Ow, what a head!  I certainly do feel like the wrath of God this morning.  Say!  I know what was the trouble!  Somebody went and put alcohol in my booze last night.”

Babbitt’s excursion was never known to his family, nor to any one in Zenith save Rogers and Wing.  It was not officially recognized even by himself.  If it had any consequences, they have not been discovered.

CHAPTER XIV

This autumn a Mr. W. G. Harding, of Marion, Ohio, was appointed President of the United States, but Zenith was less interested in the national campaign than in the local election.  Seneca Doane, though he was a lawyer and a graduate of the State University, was candidate for mayor of Zenith on an alarming labor ticket.  To oppose him the Democrats and Republicans united on Lucas Prout, a mattress-manufacturer with a perfect record for sanity.  Mr. Prout was supported by the banks, the Chamber of Commerce, all the decent newspapers, and George F. Babbitt.

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