Secret Adversary eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 220 pages of information about Secret Adversary.

“Oh, I dare say.”

“But I suppose you prefer sterling worth,” said Tuppence demurely.

“I—­oh, dash it all, Tuppence, you know!”

“I like your uncle, Tommy,” said Tuppence, hastily creating a diversion.  “By the way, what are you going to do, accept Mr. Carter’s offer of a Government job, or accept Julius’s invitation and take a richly remunerated post in America on his ranch?”

“I shall stick to the old ship, I think, though it’s awfully good of Hersheimmer.  But I feel you’d be more at home in London.”

“I don’t see where I come in.”

“I do,” said Tommy positively.

Tuppence stole a glance at him sideways.

“There’s the money, too,” she observed thoughtfully.

“What money?”

“We’re going to get a cheque each.  Mr. Carter told me so.”

“Did you ask how much?” inquired Tommy sarcastically.

“Yes,” said Tuppence triumphantly.  “But I shan’t tell you.”

“Tuppence, you are the limit!”

“It has been fun, hasn’t it, Tommy?  I do hope we shall have lots more adventures.”

“You’re insatiable, Tuppence.  I’ve had quite enough adventures for the present.”

“Well, shopping is almost as good,” said Tuppence dreamily.

“Think of buying old furniture, and bright carpets, and futurist silk curtains, and a polished dining-table, and a divan with lots of cushions.”

“Hold hard,” said Tommy.  “What’s all this for?”

“Possibly a house—­but I think a flat.”

“Whose flat?”

“You think I mind saying it, but I don’t in the least!  Ours, so there!”

“You darling!” cried Tommy, his arms tightly round her.  “I was determined to make you say it.  I owe you something for the relentless way you’ve squashed me whenever I’ve tried to be sentimental.”

Tuppence raised her face to his.  The taxi proceeded on its course round the north side of Regent’s Park.

“You haven’t really proposed now,” pointed out Tuppence.  “Not what our grandmothers would call a proposal.  But after listening to a rotten one like Julius’s, I’m inclined to let you off.”

“You won’t be able to get out of marrying me, so don’t you think it.”

“What fun it will be,” responded Tuppence.  “Marriage is called all sorts of things, a haven, and a refuge, and a crowning glory, and a state of bondage, and lots more.  But do you know what I think it is?”

“What?”

“A sport!”

“And a damned good sport too,” said Tommy.

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Project Gutenberg
Secret Adversary from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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