The Life and Letters of Elizabeth Prentiss eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 929 pages of information about The Life and Letters of Elizabeth Prentiss.

[7] Helen Rogers Blakeman, wife of W. N. Blakeman, M.D., was born on the 20th of December, 1811, in the city of New York.  She was a granddaughter of the Rev. James Caldwell, of Elizabethtown, New Jersey, the Revolutionary patriot.  The tragical fate of her grandmother has passed into history.  When the British forces reached Connecticut Farms, on the 7th of June, 1780, and began to burn and pillage the place, Mrs. Caldwell, who was then living there, retired with her two children—­one an infant in her arms—­to a back room in the house.  Here, while engaged in prayer, she was shot through the window.  Two bullets struck her in the breast and she fell dead upon the floor.  The infant in her arms was Mrs. Blakeman’s mother.  On the father’s side, too, she was of an old and God-fearing family.

[8] “Your precious lamb was very near my heart; few knew so well as I did all you suffered for and with her, for few have been over just the ground I have.  But that is little to the purpose; what I was going to say is this,—­’God never makes a mistake.’  You know and feel it, I am sure, but when we are broken down with grief, we like to hear simple words, oft repeated.  On this anniversary of my child’s death, I feel drawn to you.  It was a great blow to us because it came to hearts already sore with sorrow for our boy, and because it came so like a thunderclap, and because she suffered so.  Your baby’s death brought it all back.”—­From the Letter to Mrs. W.

[9] “I must tell you what a busy day I had yesterday, being chaplain, marketer, mother, author, and consoler from early morning till nine at night....  A letter came from Cincinnati from the editor of the hymn-book of the Y.M.C.A., saying he had some of my hymns in it, and had stopped the press in order to have two more, which he wanted ‘right away.’  I was exactly in the mood; it was our little Bessie’s anniversary, she had been in heaven eighteen years; think what she has already gained by my one year of suffering! and I wanted to spend it for others, not for myself.”—­Letter to her Husband, May 20.

[10] Nidworth, and His Three Magic Wands, published by Roberts Brothers.

CHAPTER XII.

THE TRIAL OF FAITH.

1871-1872.

I.

Two Years of Suffering.  Its Nature and Causes.  Spiritual Conflicts.  Ill-health.  Faith a Gift to be won by Prayer.  Death-bed of Dr. Skinner.  Visit to Philadelphia.  “Daily Food.”  How to read the Bible so as to love it more.  Letters of Sympathy and Counsel.  “Prayer for Holiness brings Suffering.”  Perils of human Friendship.

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The Life and Letters of Elizabeth Prentiss from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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