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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 353 pages of information about O. Henry Memorial Award Prize Stories of 1921.

THE HEART OF LITTLE SHIKARA.  By Edison Marshall

The man who cursed the lilies.  By Charles Tenney Jackson

The urge.  By Maryland Allen

Mummery.  By Thomas Beer

The victim of his vision.  By Gerald Chittenden

Martin Gerrity gets even.  By Courtney Ryley Cooper and Leo F. Creagan

Stranger things.  By Mildred Cram

Comet.  By Samuel A. Derieux

Fifty-two weeks for Florette.  By Elizabeth Alexander Heermann

Wild earth.  By Sophie Kerr

The tribute.  By Harry Anable Kniffin

The get-away.  By O.F.  Lewis

Aurore.”  By Ethel Watts Mumford

Mr. Downey sits down.  By L.H.  Robbins

The marriage in Kairwan.  By Wilbur Daniel Steele

Grit.  By Tristram Tupper

FOUNDER OF THE O. HENRY MEMORIAL COMMITTEE

The plan for the creation of the O. Henry Memorial Committee was conceived and the work of the Committee inaugurated in the year 1918 by the late John F. Tucker, ll.M., then Directing Manager of the Society of Arts and Sciences.  The Society promptly approved the plan and appropriated the sum necessary to inaugurate its work and to make the award.

The Committee is, therefore, in a sense, a memorial to Mr. Tucker, as well as to O. Henry.  Up to the time of his death Mr. Tucker was a constant adviser of the Committee and an attendant at most of its meetings.

Born in New York City in 1871 and educated for the law, Mr. Tucker’s inclinations quickly swept him into a much wider stream of intellectual development, literary, artistic, and sociological.  He joined others in reviving the Twilight Club (now the Society of Arts and Sciences), for the broad discussion of public questions, and to the genius he developed for such a task the success of the Society up to the time of his death was chiefly due.  The remarkable series of dinner discussions conducted under his management, for many years, in New York City, have helped to mould public opinion along liberal lines, to educate and inspire.  Nothing he did gave him greater pride than the inception of the O. Henry Memorial Committee, and that his name should be associated with that work perpetually this tribute is hereby printed at the request of the Society of Arts and Sciences.  E.J.W.

INTRODUCTION

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