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This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 142 pages of information about Darkest India.

3.  The circumstances and surroundings of the European and Eurasian community are so different that the scheme will require considerable readaptation.  Indeed the subject will need a pamphlet to itself, and I have found it impossible to work it harmoniously into the present scheme.

4.  I am convinced moreover that this is a subsidiary question, and that our main efforts must be directed towards reaching and uplifting the purely Indian submerged.

5.  Should however the question be pressed upon us hereafter, we shall be quite prepared to take it up and deal with it systematically and radically on the lines laid down by General Booth.  I have studied with considerable care and interest the writings of the late Mr. White on this important matter, and believe that if the necessary funds were forthcoming, it would be comparatively easy for us to adapt the Darkest England Scheme to the necessities of this important class.

PUBLIC OPINION ON GENERAL BOOTH’S SOCIAL SCHEME.

Her Majesty the Queen-Empress cordially sympathises.

Her Majesty says “The Queen cannot of course express any opinion on the details of the scheme, but understanding that your object is to alleviate misery and suffering, her Majesty cordially wishes you success in the undertaking you have originated.”

His Royal Highness, The Prince of Wales,

Writes to express his hearty interest in the scheme and is seen earnestly studying the book and making notes upon it.

The Empress Frederick reads the book with interest.

THE EMPRESS FREDERICK’S PALACE, BERLIN,

November 1, 1890.

Count Seckendorff begs leave to acknowledge by command of her Majesty the Empress Frederick the receipt of General Booth’s book in “Darkest England and the way out.”  Count Seckendorff is commanded to say that her Majesty will read the book with special interest.

The Earl of Aberdeen expresses his sympathy.

In common with thousands of others I have been studying your “plan of campaign.”  Last night I saw Mr. Bancroft’s letter.  I think he has performed a public service in coming forward in this spirited manner at the present time.  Those who have been in any way associated with past or existing efforts on behalf of the classes which you aim at reaching should reasonably be amongst the first to welcome a scheme so practical, so comprehensive, and so carefully devised as that which you have placed before the country.  I shall be happy to become one of the hundred contributors who according to Mr. Bancroft’s proposal shall each be responsible for L1,000 on the condition specified.  With the offer of sympathy, and the assurance of hearty good wishes,

I remain, yours very faithfully,

ABERDEEN.

The Earl of Airlie Subscribes.

“The Earl of Airlie has forwarded towards General Booth’s fund a cheque for L1,000.”

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