Armenian Literature eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 179 pages of information about Armenian Literature.

SALOME.  Be quiet!  Enough!  Give yourself no unnecessary heartache.

NATO [jumps up and embraces Salome].  Dear, dear mamma! dearest mamma, save me!

SALOME.  Oh, rather would your mother be dead than to see this day!

NATO.  Dear mamma, save me! save me, or I shall go into consumption!  God is my witness!

SALOME [weeping].  The deuce take everything!
                    [Wipes away her tears.

NATO.  Mamma, if you please, I would rather not marry at all.  I will serve you here at home like a housemaid.  Only make them stop this affair!

SALOME.  That has already happened, my child.

NATO.  Dear mamma, please do it.

SALOME.  But I tell you, truly.

NATO.  Is it really true?

SALOME.  As true as the sun shines.

NATO [kissing Salome].  O my dear, dear mamma!

SALOME.  At last I am rid of you.  Your eyes are real tear-fountains.  It would not have taken much more to make me cry, too.

NATO [laughing].  Ha! ha! ha!

SALOME.  You can laugh now.

NATO.  Ha! ha! ha! you gave me such a fright!

SALOME.  You are terribly flighty. [Presses the money into her hand.]
Here, take it; and do not be too long.
                    [Smoothes Nato’s hair.

NATO [pulling herself away from her mother].  Very well, mamma.
                    [Taking her parasol and mantle.

SALOME.  Wipe your eyes, I pray, or they will laugh at you!

NATO.  They are quite dry; and what does anybody care about my eyes?
                    [Going.

SALOME.  Come back soon; don’t allow yourself to be delayed.

NATO.  I will come back right away, dear mamma.
                    [Goes toward the right into the ante-room.

SCENE IV

SALOME [alone].  No, there is no other way out.  Cost what it will, I shall accomplish what I want.  Yes, I must, if I am ruined by it.  Mother of God, plead for my Nato!

OSSEP [enters, right].  Where has Nato gone?

SALOME.  Just across the way, to the store.  She needed some music.

OSSEP.  These are fine times for me!  And a girl like this is to become a good citizen’s wife! [Sits down on the sofa.

SALOME [coming near].  That is what I say, too, dear Ossep. [Lays hand on his shoulder.] Are you not sorry?  Is it not too bad about her?

OSSEP.  I am still more to be pitied; but who pities me?  SALOME.  Shall we really give her to a business man for a wife?

OSSEP.  And what else?  Is a merchant such a bad fellow?  To judge by your words, I also am good for nothing; I who, day and night, worry myself to get you bread.

SALOME [embracing him].  How can you say such a thing, dear Ossep?  Listen to me; are you not sorry for Nato?  It would be quite different if she had been educated as I was.

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Project Gutenberg
Armenian Literature from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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