A Visit to the United States in 1841 eBook

Joseph Sturge
This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 308 pages of information about A Visit to the United States in 1841.
mentioned, and had thereby done something material in the progress of the work.  It was only to get a minute passed upon their books to the intended effect.  Accordingly, at the very first Monthly Meeting of the Society, which took place in Philadelphia in the present year, he proposed the subject.  He laid before them the concern which had been so long upon his mind, relative to these unfortunate people; he pressed upon them the duty of allowing them as frequently as possible to attend their Meetings for worship, and the benefit that would accrue to both, by the instruction of them in the principles of the Christian religion.  The result was, that a Meeting was appointed more particularly for the negroes, once every month; so that besides the common opportunities they had of collecting religious knowledge, by frequenting the places of worship, there was one day in the month, in which, as far as the influence of the Monthly Meeting extended, they could neither be temporally nor spiritually overlooked.  At this Meeting also, he proposed means, which were acceded to, for a more frequent intercourse between Friends and the Indians; he (William Penn,) taking upon himself the charge of procuring interpreters, as well as of forwarding the means proposed.”—­Vol.  II. pp. 218-222.

APPENDIX C. P. 34.

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE OF THE YEARLY MEETING OF FRIENDS, HELD IN
PHILADELPHIA, APPOINTED FOR THE GRADUAL CIVILIZATION, &C., OF THE INDIAN
NATIVES, PRESENTED TO THE MEETING, FOURTH MONTH 21ST, 1841, AND DIRECTED
TO BE PRINTED FOR THE USE OF THE MEMBERS.

    “TO THE YEARLY MEETING.

    “The Committee charged with promoting the Gradual Improvement
    and Civilization of the Indian Natives, report:—­

“That although they have given attention to this interesting concern, there are but few subjects in their operations, since the last report, which require notice.  The Indians have been in a very unsettled condition during the past year, in consequence of the embarrassment and distress produced by the ratification of the treaty, and their uncertainty as to the best course to be pursued by them in their trying and perplexing circumstances.  They still cling to the hope that they shall be able to ward off the calamity which threatens them, either through the favorable disposition of the new Administration and Senate, to give their case a re-hearing, or by an Appeal to the Supreme Court of the United States.  Small as the hope afforded by these sources may appear to a disinterested observer, they are buoyed up by it, and seem as unwilling as ever, to look toward relinquishing their present homes.
“In a communication addressed to the committee, dated Tunesassah, Fifth Month 24th, 1840, signed by ten chiefs, they say, ’Although, the information of the ratification of the treaty is distressing to us, yet it is a satisfaction to hear
Copyrights
Project Gutenberg
A Visit to the United States in 1841 from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
Follow Us on Facebook