The Refugees eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 452 pages of information about The Refugees.

“I shall do so.”

“Then, should a note come from her—­you understand me, the new one—­”

“Madame de Maintenon?”

“Precisely.  But it is more discreet not to mention names.  Should she send a note, you will take it and deliver it quietly when the king gives you an opportunity.”

“It shall be done.”

“But if the other should come, as is possible enough—­the other, you understand me, the former—­”

“Madame de Montespan.”

“Ah, that soldierly tongue of yours, captain!  Should she come, I say, you will gently bar her way, with courteous words, you understand, but on no account is she to be permitted to enter the royal room.”

“Very good, Bontems.”

“And now we have but three minutes.”

He strode through the rapidly increasing group of people in the corridor with an air of proud humility as befitted a man who, if he was a valet, was at least the king of valets, by being the valet of the king.  Close by the door stood a line of footmen, resplendent in their powdered wigs, red plush coats, and silver shoulder knots.

“Is the officer of the oven here?” asked Bontems.

“Yes, sir,” replied a functionary who bore in front of him an enamelled tray heaped with pine shavings.

“The opener of the shutters?”

“Here, sir.”

“The remover of the taper?”

“Here, sir.”

“Be ready for the word.”  He turned the handle once more, and slipped into the darkened room.

It was a large square apartment, with two high windows upon the further side, curtained across with priceless velvet hangings.  Through the chinks the morning sun shot a few little gleams, which widened as they crossed the room to break in bright blurs of light upon the primrose-tinted wall.  A large arm-chair stood by the side of the burnt-out fire, shadowed over by the huge marble mantel-piece, the back of which was carried up twining and curving into a thousand arabesque and armorial devices until it blended with the richly painted ceiling.  In one corner a narrow couch with a rug thrown across it showed where the faithful Bontems had spent the night.

In the very centre of the chamber there stood a large four-post bed, with curtains of Gobelin tapestry looped back from the pillow.  A square of polished rails surrounded it, leaving a space some five feet in width all round between the enclosure and the bedside.  Within this enclosure, or ruelle, stood a small round table, covered over with a white napkin, upon which lay a silver platter and an enamelled cup, the one containing a little Frontiniac wine and water, the other bearing three slices of the breast of a chicken, in case the king should hunger during the night.

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The Refugees from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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