Aesop's Fables; a new translation eBook

This eBook from the Gutenberg Project consists of approximately 119 pages of information about Aesop's Fables; a new translation.

There was a time in the youth of the world when Goods and Ills entered equally into the concerns of men, so that the Goods did not prevail to make them altogether blessed, nor the Ills to make them wholly miserable.  But owing to the foolishness of mankind the Ills multiplied greatly in number and increased in strength, until it seemed as though they would deprive the Goods of all share in human affairs, and banish them from the earth.  The latter, therefore, betook themselves to heaven and complained to Jupiter of the treatment they had received, at the same time praying him to grant them protection from the Ills, and to advise them concerning the manner of their intercourse with men.  Jupiter granted their request for protection, and decreed that for the future they should not go among men openly in a body, and so be liable to attack from the hostile Ills, but singly and unobserved, and at infrequent and unexpected intervals.  Hence it is that the earth is full of Ills, for they come and go as they please and are never far away; while Goods, alas! come one by one only, and have to travel all the way from heaven, so that they are very seldom seen.

THE HARES AND THE FROGS

The Hares once gathered together and lamented the unhappiness of their lot, exposed as they were to dangers on all sides and lacking the strength and the courage to hold their own.  Men, dogs, birds and beasts of prey were all their enemies, and killed and devoured them daily:  and sooner than endure such persecution any longer, they one and all determined to end their miserable lives.  Thus resolved and desperate, they rushed in a body towards a neighbouring pool, intending to drown themselves.  On the bank were sitting a number of Frogs, who, when they heard the noise of the Hares as they ran, with one accord leaped into the water and hid themselves in the depths.  Then one of the older Hares who was wiser than the rest cried out to his companions, “Stop, my friends, take heart; don’t let us destroy ourselves after all:  see, here are creatures who are afraid of us, and who must, therefore, be still more timid than ourselves.”

THE FOX AND THE STORK

A Fox invited a Stork to dinner, at which the only fare provided was a large flat dish of soup.  The Fox lapped it up with great relish, but the Stork with her long bill tried in vain to partake of the savoury broth.  Her evident distress caused the sly Fox much amusement.  But not long after the Stork invited him in turn, and set before him a pitcher with a long and narrow neck, into which she could get her bill with ease.  Thus, while she enjoyed her dinner, the Fox sat by hungry and helpless, for it was impossible for him to reach the tempting contents of the vessel.

THE WOLF IN SHEEP’S CLOTHING

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Project Gutenberg
Aesop's Fables; a new translation from Project Gutenberg. Public domain.
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